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Full text of "The Pasquaney annual"

M: '-■'•:; !■ 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/pasquaneyannual1923bris 



2P-/V 



OUNTY PUBLIC LIBRA 



3 1833 03581 9496 

fGo 9 74.20? B7 6 pa '1923 

The Pas qua nay annual 




ACPL 



Donated 

to THE 

Allen County Public Library 

GIFT OF 
MIKE MC CARTHY & FAMILY 
FORT WAYNE, IN 
JULY 1999 



Sty* 



Pasqttaney Annual 



... of ... 



1023 



PUBLISHED PRIVATELY 

MUSGROVE PRINTING HOUSE 
BRISTOL, N H 



Allen County Public Library 
900 Webster Street 
PO Box 2270 

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 



Hi is Edition is limited to 
one hundred and twenty-five numbered eopies 

This Copy is Xo. \Jl 



THE APPROACH TO PASQUANLY 




OUR "LANE BEAUTIFUL" 



THE COUNCIL, 1923 



Edward Simpson Wilson, Ph.B., Yale, 1885 
"Eastbourne Place," Bridgewater, N. H. 



Edward William Cecil Jackson, A.B., Harvard, 1902 
Bridgewater, N. H. 

John Marshall Crosman, B.S., Haverford, 1918 
Haverford, Pa. 

Donald Davidson Kennedy, Princeton, 1924 
Cottage Club, Princeton, N. J. 

Leonard Tomb Davidson, A.B., Oberlin, 1912 

M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1919 

667 Madison Ave., New York City 

John William Spaeth, Jr., A.B., Haverford, 1917 

A.M., Harvard, 1918 

Princeton Graduate College, Princeton, N. J. 

Udolpho Theodore Bradley, A.B., Princeton, 1923 
Pomfret School, Pomfret, Conn. 

John Cranwill Thompson, Wesleyan, 1924 
Psi Upsilon House, Middletown, Conn. 

Richard Grafflin Sagebeer, A.B., Haverford, 1922 
Berwyn, Pa. 

William Stackhouse Scull, 2nd, Princeton, 1925 
511 Pyne Hall, Princeton, N. J. 

Theodore Henry Hinchman, Jr., Princeton, 1925 
1030 Van Dyke Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

David Kimball Grant, 

New England Conservatory of Music 

156 Park Street, Newton, Mass. 

Eliot Codman, Harvard, 1927 
3 Arlington Street, Boston, Mass. 

Wallace Parks Ritchie, Yale, 1927 
46 Crocus Place, St. Paul, Minn. 



THE PASOUAXEY ANNUAL 




SOME. OF OUR 1923 SNAPSHOTS 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



The Council — Continued 

William Bernard Macomber, Harvard, 1926 
137 Gardner Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Frank Guthrie Akers, Harvard, 1925 
6 Holyoke Place, Cambridge, Mass. 

John Davis Lodge, Harvard, 1925 
27 Beck Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 

Clarence Loveridge Robbins, Yale, 1925 
943 Memorial Quadrangle, New Haven, Conn. 

John McCook Roots, Harvard, 1925 
47 Randolph Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 



Gilbert Bater Bovaird 

2136 North 18th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Assistant Secretary 



CAPTAINS OF INDUSTRY 



Charles D. Gowing Appo 


inted 1922 


David B. Hinchman 


1922 


Donald Murchie 


1922 


Frank O. Reed 


1922 


Walter H. Lillard, Jr. 


1922 


John L. Rakestraw 


1923 


A. Treadwell White, Jr. 


1923 


Richard C. Berresford 


1923 


Huntington Miller 


1923 


Thomas H. Eliot 


1923 


Percy Owen, Jr. 


1923 


Edwin W. Ritchie 


1923 


James W. Henning, 3rd 


1923 



THE BOY5, 1923 



James Barr Ames, 
Glezen Lane, 
Wayland, Mass. 
Earle Kelly Anthony, 
2550 Aberdeen Avenue, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Lloyd Bankson, 2nd, 

Haverford, Pa. 
Philip Van Dyke Beckwith, 
1049 Prospect Avenue, 
Hartford, Conn. 
Roderick Beebe, Jr. 
Cottage Street, 
Marion, Mass. 
Richard Case Berresford, 
190 Riverside Drive, 
New York City. 
Robert Biddle, 3rd, 
607 Bank Avenue, 
Riverton, N. J. 
Herbert Dick Blabon, 
Bryn Mawr Avenue, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Edward Moffett Brainard, 
87 Washington Street, 
Hartford, Conn. 
George Wales Brewster, 
213 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass. 
Robert Catlin Buell, Jr., 
114 Vernon Street, 
Hartford, Conn. 
Richard Beaumaris Bulkeley, Jr., 
275 Kenyon Street, 
Hartford, Conn. 
Henry Driggs Burrall, 
41 Church Street, 
Waterbury, Conn. 



Barry Bingay Cann, Jr., 
468 Willow Street, 
Waterbury, Conn. 
William Talbot Carleton, 
11 Loring Street, 

Newton Center, Mass. 
Franklin Pattison Cator, 
511 Roland Avenue, 

Roland Park, Baltimore, Md. 

Edgar Moore Church, Jr., 
2046 Locust Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
John Allen Clarke, 
5 Lakeview Terrace, 
Winchester, Mass. 
Daniel Sargent Codman, 
3 Arlington Street, 
Boston, Mass. 
Samuel Eliot Codman, 
3 Arlington Street, 
Boston, Mass. 
Samuel Colgate, 
Llewellyn Park, 

West Orange, N. J. 
John Norman Curtis, 
5870 Drexel Road, 

Overbrook, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Richard Henry Dana, 3rd, 
137 East 66th Street, 
New York City. 
Frederick Tallmadge Day, 
441 Fowler Avenue, 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Herbert John Deacon, 

17184 East Jefferson Avenue, 
Grosse Pointe, Mich. 



12 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



Willis Scull De La Cour, 
603 Bank Avenue, 
Riverton, X. J. 
Richard Dana deRham, 
Cold Spring-on-Hudson, 
New York. 
Thomas Hopkinson Eliot, 
25 Reservoir Street, 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Ralston Biddle Fitler, 
Cherry Lane, 

Wynnewood, Pa. 
Joseph Warner Fobes, Jr., 
72> Library Place, 
Princeton, N. J. 
Richard Holden Follis, Jr., 
3 East Read Street, 
Baltimore, Md. 
William Whitehead Fuller, 2nd, 
1072 Fifth Avenue, 
New York City. 
Charles Chauncey Goodrich, 
61 North Beacon Street, 
Hartford, Conn. 
Charles Darrow Gowing, 
74 Monmouth Street, 
Brookline, Mass. 
Robert Bigelow Gowing, 
74 Monmouth Street, 
Brookline, Mass. 
George Huntress Grant, 
229 Culver Road, 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Robert Gray, 

136 Brunswick Avenue, 
Gardiner, Me. 
Francis Appleton Harding, 

Dedham, Mass. 
John Briard Harding, 
Dedham, Mass. 



William McCord Harris, Jr., 
Riverdale-on-Hudson, 
. New York City. 
David Steele Hart, 
17 Frederick Street, 
Waterbury, Conn. 
Edmund Thatcher Hawes, 
7 Doane Street, 
Fairhaven, Mass. 
Basil Duke Henning, 
943 Cherokee Road, 
Louisville, Ky. 
James Williamson Henning, 3rd, 
943 Cherokee Road, 
Louisville, Ky. 
David Ballentine Hinchman, 
1030 Van Dyke Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. 
John Marshall Hinchman, 2nd, 
1030 Van Dyke Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. 
Buell Hollister, 

4 East Fifth Street, 

Corning, N. Y. 

Henry Crane Hollister, 

195 Heights Road, 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

John Howland, Jr. 

Oak Place, Charles Street, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Wnitney Ford Hoyt, 

30 North Goodman Street, 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Frederick Bernard Hufnagel, Jr., 
407 Quaker Road, 
Sewickley, Pa. 
Floyd Wellman Jefferson, Jr., 
Short Hills, N. T. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



*3 



Thomas Louis Jefferson, 
63 Mulberry Street, 
Springfield, Mass. 
William Fenwick Keyser, 
1114 St. Paul Street, 
' Baltimore, Md. 
Herbert Thorn King, Jr., 
Tower Hill Road, 
Tuxedo Park, N. Y. 
Ivy Ledbetter Lee, Jr., 
4 East 66th Street, 
New York City. 
Frederick Norton Leonard, 

Morris Plains, N. J. 
Walter Huston Lillard, Jr., 
21 Front Street, 
Marion, Mass. 
Ellwood Caldwell Lindsay, Jr., 
5869 Overbrook Avenue, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
John Franciscus Lindsay, 
5869 Overbrook Avenue, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Carrington Mason Lloyd, 
65 Prospect Park, 
Newtonville, Mass. 
Billy Pool McCarthy, 

4450 Woodlawn Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 
Clarence Alvin McCarthy, Jr., 
4450 Woodlawn Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 
Gibson Mcllvain, 

East Downingtown, Pa. 
Huntington Miller, 
243 Summit Avenue, 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Townsend Munson, 
Latches Lane, 
Overbrook, Pa. 



Donald Murchie, 

21 Commonwealth Avenue, 
Boston, Mass. 
Guy Murchie, Jr., 

21 Commonwealth Avenue, 
Boston, Mass. 
Howell Kenton Newlin, 

Whitford, Pa. 
Robert Littleton Nields, 
40 Princeton Avenue, 
Princeton, N. J. 
Kenneth Charles Ogden, Jr. 
614 Monterey Avenue, 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Percy Owen, Jr., 

1791 Burns Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. 
George Shipman Payson, 2nd, 
68 Neal Street, 
Portland, Me. 
Edward Hyde Rakestraw, 
5917 Drexel Road, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
John Louis Rakestraw, 
5917 Drexel Road, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Frank Otheman Reed, 
134 North Street, 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Edwin Winter Ritchie, 
46 Crocus Place, 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Sheldon Roots, 
396 Main Street, 
Hartford, Conn. 
Leonard Jacob Sanford, 
245 Whitney Avenue, 
New Haven, Conn. 
Charles Sprague Sargent, 3rd. 
Cedarhurst, 

Long Island, N. Y. 



H 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Winthrop Sargent, 3rd, 
Glynn Wynn Road, 
Haverford, Pa. 
Theodore Carmalt Scull, 
111 South 20th Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Newton Melman Shaffer, 
31 East 49th St., 
New York City. 
Charles Fuller Stanwood, 
165 Main Street, 
Brunswick, Me. 
Irving Taylor, 
23 Lowell Road, 

Schenectady, N. Y. 
Edward Thaw, Jr., 
Brush Hill Road, 
Readville, Mass. 
Wirt Lord Thompson, Jr 
204 Wyncote Road, 
Jenkintown, Pa. 



3rd, 



William Kneeland Townsend, 
18 Prescott Avenue, 
Bronxville, X. Y. 
Laurence Edward Tracy, 
46 West 51st Street. 
New York City. 
Joseph Roy Yetterlein, Jr., 

107 East Montgomery Avenue, 
Ardmore, Pa. 
Austin Treadwell White, Jr., 

Kendall Green, Mass. 
James Bolton Winpenny, 2nd, 
7247 Limekiln Pike, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
William Henry Winstead, Jr., 
Ruxton, Baltimore Co., 
Maryland. 
Perry Edward Wurst, Jr., 
564 Lafayette Avenue, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 




OUR "CHAPEL IN THE PINES 



TLhc flbasquanes Hnnual 

CONTINUATION OF 

Sbe Wbite Mvcb 

(Published annually by and for the members of Camp Pasquaney) 



VOL. XXV 



NEW SERIES 



1923 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Edward Simpson Wilson, Chairman 
Edward W. C. Jackson, Business Manager 
John W. Spaeth, Jr., Managing Editor 
T. Henry Hinchman, Jr., Associate Editor 
John C. Thompson, Staff Cartoonist 



editorial staff 
Charles D. Gowing 



Frank O. '. 


Reed 


Donald 


Murchie 


Richard 


C. 


Berresford 


Thomas 


H 


. Eliot 


Robert 


B. 


Gowing 



BUSINESS STAFF 

James W. Henning, 3rd 
A. Treadwell White, Jr. 
Philip Van D. Beckwith 
Townsend Munson 
Frederick N. Leonard 



LDITORIAL5 



Too near a view of the Old Man 
of the Mountains would reveal only 
rocks, — no Profile. The too minute 
analysis of the character of an indi- 
vidual, or of the Camp Community, 
reveals fragments only, — nothing 
real. The clean wholesomeness of 
Camp might cease to attract if it 
were never observed in true per- 
spective from a distance. 



But how else can we obtain a cor- 
rect impression of a season than by 
tiresome waiting? Sometimes the 
Profile of the Old Man can be 
found mirrored in the face of an 
individual. Sometimes a single 
happening will reveal the meaning 
behind the whole season. A fine 
exhibition of sportsmanship is not 
a little thing: it is the result of a 



i6 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



season's training. The thrill of 
sympathy and of appreciation which 
runs through the crowd assembled 
at Memorial Hall for the last sup- 
per of the season is not meaningless. 
1 1 reflects the manhood of the whole 
summer, raises new hopes, and kin- 
dles ambition. The trophy given 
here represents not a few minutes 
of racing, but rather a season's work 
and devotion. It indicates the true 
success of that person's hopes. It 
shows more, — the success of the 
Summer's work. 

But not nearly all of the things 
we learn can be exhibited so soon. 
The image on the film is invisible, 
latent, — until dipped into a strong 
chemical. The world is like that 
chemical. The world we return to 
from Camp, then, must be faced as 
a challenge rather than as an un- 
fortunate evil. Its roughness stim- 
ulates and exercises the principles 
taught under ideal conditions. 
Friendship, started at Camp, is 
broadened and deepened by months 
of separation ; but many a fair- 
weather friend has cooled off, in- 
stead, as winter separates him from 
the other. 

What, then, are some of the in- 
dications of a successful year, as 
seen from the proper distance? Cer- 
tainly not merely freedom from mis- 
takes. The ability to profit by mis- 
takes, to meet the world on open 
ground, and to strive with the true 
sportsmanship which can only be 
instinctive sportsmanship, — t hose 



are the tests. How will the mem- 
ories of Camp survive the winter? 
Will the friendships of summer out- 
live the winter? If they do, they 
will be invigorated by the ordeal. 
The person who stands off and sees 
clearly the meaning behind his sum- 
mer, and who then reflects this 
vision into the world about him. 
has proved that his Camp enjoyed 
a successful season. 

"C O. I." 



In discussing the salient features 
of the season of 1923, almost every- 
one who has come in close contact 
with the Camp has remarked upon 
the unusually high quality of the 
older boys. Many times such words 
as these have been heard: "It is 
the finest bunch of older boys I 
have ever seen, both in number and 
quality." This is true. Usually 
there are a few who stand out prom- 
inently ; this year there has been a 
large group to each individual of 
which Pasquaney may well be 
proud to point as one of her boys. 

In thinking over this situation it 
occurs to one that this is the fifth 
year since the formation of a body 
of older boys into what was at first 
known as a "Senior Council," but 
whose members have ever since 
been called "Captains of Industry," 
a name descriptive of the positions 
which these boys hold in our own 
little world. In 1918 Mr. Ned, 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



*7 




Photograph by J. C. Thompson 

SUNDAY MORNING CHURCH PARADE 



realizing that he was to have an in- 
experienced Council, on account of 
the lack of suitable material caused 
by the World War, formed this 
group along the lines of a college 
Senior Council or a school Self- 
Government Committee, hoping 
that he could depend upon them to 
put their shoulders to the wheel 
and push that season through to 
success. In its first year the new 
idea was not wholly successful. 
But profiting by their own mistakes, 
these "Captains" have now come 
to be a very powerful element in 
the progress of each summer. 

The place of "C. O. I." is coveted 
by every older boy in Camp, and 
Mr. Ned's Sunday night announce- 
ments of new appointments made 
at the afternoon council meetings 



are eagerly awaited. Two very 
young boys were heard to remark 
this year that they were coming 
back every summer until they be- 
came Captains of Industry. This 
incentive, as well as the responsi- 
bility which comes with the attain- 
ment of the position, has, it would 
seem, produced one of the finest 
groups of boys which ever worked 
for the success of a Pasquaney sum- 
mer. It has given these boys an 
experience which will make some 
of them, as it has often done for 
others in the past few years, fit 
members of future Pasquaney coun- 
cils. 

In spite of the fact that there 
have been more "Captains" this year 
than ever before, — tnirteen at the 
end of the summer, — there has been 



i8 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



no lowering of the standard of at- 
tainment. Rather is this fact in- 
dicative of the sterling quality of 
the boys who have breathed the 
Pasquaney atmosphere long enough 
to become imbued to the core with 
that indefinable something which 
no one but an old boy or an old 
counsellor can have the privilege 
of understanding, — the true Pas- 
quaney spirit. 




Photograph by J. C. Thompson 

TRADITION HALL 



% %■ H« *£ H 5 



ANOTHER PASQUANEY 

LESSON 



Pasquaney teaches many con- 
spicuous lessons, but there is one 
which comes to mind that is very 
little, if ever, emphasized. This is 
the lesson of discernment or charac- 
ter analysis. 

In the Council meetings, in the 
meetings of the two societies, the 
characteristics of every boy are dis- 
cussed ; and such discussions, be- 
cause they search the depths of fun- 
damentals which go toward the 
making of character and outline the 
standards that boys must attain, if 
possible, create a faculty for distin- 
guishing between desirable and un- 
desirable qualities. If these dis- 
cussions ever become microscopic 
and of the "hair-splitting" variety, 
it is due to the necessity of choos- 
ing the winner, perhaps, of some 
honor for which, oftentimes, there 



are several candidates and such 
discussions are always accompanied 
by a general regret that they should 
be so exacting. 

The faculty of discernment has an 
important value. It is evident in 
choosing a new friend, a business 
partner, or an employee ; and, if 
one can perceive fairly how r well this 
person or that lives up to the re- 
quired standards, the margin for 
disappointment is lessened. For 
all too often, we are blinded in our 
estimations by one thing or another. 

But discrimination does not apply 
only to people. We must apply it 
to abstract objects or theories. 
Here, at Pasquaney, chiefly, but not 
wholly, in the above meetings, there 
arise many occasions on which a 
wise choice or decision must be 
made by the individual. In later 
life, in finding one's true religion, 
in backing a political principle, or 
in selecting a life work, we must 
bring our powers of discernment 
into play. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



19 



So, let us add to Pasquaney's 
long list of honored contributions 
the fact that we are unconsciously 
trained to distinguish and recognize 
persons and things as they really 
are. 

R. C. Berresford. 



"Tommy" Hawes, "Eddie" Ber- 
wind, "Bill" Sanford, "Jim" Bo- 
vaird, "Alec" Phelps, Thruston 
Morton, Telford Taylor, and "Char- 
lie" Clarke, '22. 






It was with great pleasure that 
we welcomed back to Camp a large 
number of our "Old Boys." The 
visitors this year added consider- 
ably to the life of our community. 
It is a great stimulus to everyone 
when former members of Camp re- 
turn after a number of years, more 
enthusiastic than ever, — ready and 
anxious to enter into everything 
and to help whenever they can. 

The following were on the visit- 
ing list: "Miff" Frothingham and 
Henry M. Kidder, '00; Harold Pay- 
son, '02; "Val" Dunne, "Rod" 
Beebe, "Dick" Hoyt, and Malcolm 
Bullivant, '05; "Pa" Lillard, '07; 
"Tompy" Thompson, Allan Mac- 
Dougall, and Weaver Marston, '10; 
"Nellie" Curtis, '12; "Bill" Mudge, 
? 14; Horace Cator, '16; William 
Sargent, Howard Coonley, and 
"Bunny" Leonard, '17; "Fuzzy" 
Kneeland, '18; "Ted" Hume, 
'19; "Jack" Monroe, "Jack" Col- 
gate, and "Joe" Jeanes, '20; Owen 
Lindsay, Eliot Grant, "Dusky" 
Brownell, "Bunny" Day, and 
"Berry" Roots, '21 ; "Nat" Pope, 




Photograph by J. C. Thompson 

THL 1923 COLOR GUARD 



CAN YOU IMAGINE 

Anno Domini 1923 



The 



morning 



Doctor taking 
shower ? 

Vetterlein sinking between 
the dock and the float? 
Ned eating dinner without 
Worcestershire sauce ? 
"Udo" Bradley in a temper? 



'Joe' 



Mr. 



20 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



Newton Shatter with his wrist 

watch ? 

A Tree Talk under the 'free? 

"Robbie" Robbins with a mous- 
tache ? 

"Dick" Bulkelev without a question 
mark ? ? ? 

Mr. Jackson without "Sandy"? 

Retreat without a bugle? 

"Jack" Harding with a clear cot? 

Harry Hinchman making a "Nuth- 
ing-g" announcement ? 

"Don" Kennedy at Welton Falls? 

"Don" Murchie without his cut- 
away bath-robe? 



"Rill" Macomber wearing "Billy" 
Carleton's running pants? 

Billy McCarthy without a daily bun- 
dle of mail ? 

John Spaeth with a head of hair? 

A Saturday night entertainment 
without Miller and Murchie? 

"Marney" Crosman meeting the 
boat boys immediately after 
breakfast? 

Percy Owen quiet during rest 
period? 

"Coggin" Lindsay without Curtis? 

Sunday morning without fishcakes? 

Pasquaney without Mr. Ned? 



THE SWIMS, 1923 



HALF-MILE SWIMS 



Ames 

Beckwith 

Church 

Clarke 

Fitler 

Grant 

Harris 

Hawes 



Howland 
Hufnagel 
King 

Lindsay, J. 
McCarthy, C 
Mcllvain 
Munson 
Murchie, D. 



San ford 

Sargent, W. 

Scull 

Thaw 

Tracy 

Vetterlein 

Wurst 



MILE SWIMS 

Grant, 76 min. 
Hawes, 61:05 min. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



21 



THE SKIPPER 



When the crowd troops in from Plymouth town and straggles up tihe hill, 
When your brow is dripping moisture and your heart is far from still, 
Who is it grasps yo'ur weary hand and gives you that first thrill? 
It's the Skipper (don't you know him?), Mr. Ned. 

When the morning's thirty-seven and the showers, twice as keen, 
Make you wonder if you'll ever be the same man you have been, 
Who is it stands upon his rock till every tooth is clean? 

Why, the Skipper (can't you see him?), Mr. Ned. 

When the air is rife with mishcief and the dining room is wild 
With a hundred screeching voices, and the Council's getting riled, 
Who is it makes tihis noisy pack so Moses-like and mild? 

Just the Skipper (you can bet you!), Mr. Ned. 

When the evening's tale has ended and the campfire's glowing red, 
When the crowd has swarmed in Dana and the last Amen is said, 
Who is it speaks the parting word and sends each lad to bed? 
It's the Skipper (Heaven bless him!), Mr. Ned. 

You may find his brow beclouded and his tone is sometimes gruff, 
But you'll always find him human, kindly-wise, and fair enough: 
He's a man, with faults and virtues; but, when everything is said, 
He's a prince among earth's princes — he's our Skipper, Mr. Ned! 



CAMP STATISTICS FOR 1923 



Best Camper 
Best Athlete 
Best Built 
Sandiest 
Most Generous 
Most Improved 



(as voted by the boys) 

Donald Murchie Prettiest 

Bolton Winpenny 

Donald Murchie 

Robert Gray 

William Fuller 

William Townsend 



Barry Cann 
Camp Cow Richard Berresford 

Favorite Duty Boats 

Worst Duty Table 

Favorite College Yale 



22 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



CAMPING -PARTIES 




Sketch by J. C. Thompson 



CAMP OSAKI 



Early on a Monday morning twelve Osakis left Pasqnaney — 
Left Pasquaney, left the hillside, crossed the water to Belle Island. 
There to spend a week of pleasure — pleasure on fair Belle Island. 
First among them, great Osaki, Great Osaki, mighty chieftain. 
Mr. Xed. the Great Osaki. 

Then eleven more Osakis jumped aboard the Recreation : 
There was Donald D., the Beaver, Kennedy, world famed frog- 
hunter : 
Then came Owen Lindsay, followed by nine other young Osakis — 
Squalling, shrieking young Osakis. 

There was Eddie Ritchie, woodsman, Thomas Eliot, Billy Winstead, 
Tony Munson, weighty Otter, Billy Townsend, and the Sharp-Eye, 
Eddie Thaw, the noble Sharp-Eye, also Sheldon Roots, the Ouizzer, 
Charlie Stanwood, Freddie Leonard — these, this dozen of Osakis, 
Made life happy on Belle Island. 

( ) the long and weary journey, tiring journey made on Monday, 

Made then by a few Osakis, pursuing the elusive chicken! 

() the efforts of the Beaver, of the executing Beaver, 

Who once more upon Belle Island killed four madly flapping 

chickens ! 
() the joy of Charlie Stanwood, and of Sheldon, when the sizzling. 
Luscious ( ?) gizzards lay before them! 

O the thirst! and O the famine! that sent Beaver on the war-path, 

Leading nine Osakis 'gainst the frogs, the croaking bull-frogs 
In Goose Pond encamped and waiting. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



23 



i4 At the enemy !" cried the Beaver, "Success must perch upon our 
banners." 

But the wily frogs, escaping, fled in terror 'round the miry 

Border of their watery stronghold ; then th' Osakis staggered home- 
ward ; 

Spoils of war they carried with them, — but only eight frogs was 
their booty. 




Photograph by L. 5. Wilson 

THE. OSAKI BE.AVE.R AND HIS CUB 



O the glory ! O the victories ! When upon the sands at Crescent, 

The Osakis beat the Cliffites, beat them twice at water baseball, 

Beat them, knocked them, trounced them, slew them ! 

In the first game the Osakis swam like mad around the bases : 

Nine to two the final figures. 

In the second the Osakis made six runs to three for Marney : 

Thus the fame of the Osakis was upheld upon the ball field. 



24 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 




Photograph by £. 5. Wilson 

THE. OSAKI5 



Photograph by T. Munson 
"MADE. LIFE. HAPPY ON BELLE. ISLAND' 



O the glistening, crackling fireworks, glistening, crackling on the 

water, 
Crackling on the glistening water! 

O the dive the Beaver, frightened by the nearness of the fountain, — 
Flaming, flashing, golden fountain — took into the deep, dark waters ! 

O the brightly flaming campfire 'round which all of the Osakis 

Voted carefully statistics ; first the vote was for best camper : — 

Eddie Ritchie and Tom Eliot were judged the leaders of Osakis. 

Charlie Stanwood was Most Helpful, and, likewise, most fair Osaki ; 

Billy Winstead and the Sharp-Eye, Eddie Thaw, the noble Sharp- 
Eye, 

Each got six votes for the loudest vocal-corded young Osaki. 

Most improved was Billy Townsend, Billy Winstead was Most 
Cheerful — 

And the Beaver, Donald Kennedy, Don himself was judged the 
laziest ! 

O the gloom ! and O the Sorrow ! when upon that Friday morning- 
Fate appeared upon Belle Island, — Fate : it was the Recreation 
Come to speed the campers homeward. 

O the terror and the danger when far out to sea, the row-boat 
Broke away and floundered wildly, broadside to the roaring waters. 
O the sighs of happy memory as, the skiff once more recovered, 
The Osakis all went onward, onward through the foaming white- 
caps, 
Onward to the long green hillside, to the place of still more glad- 
ness, 
To the land of Camp Pasquaney. 

— Thomas H. Eliot. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



25 



CAMP ZERO 



(N. B. : The following article is 
the report of the counsel for the de- 
fense concerning the conduct of the 
defendant in the case of the State 
of New Hampshire against J. M. 
Crosman and party. Charges of 
disorderly conduct were brought by 
one Albert Fogg, a resident of 
Bridgewater, N. H.) 

"On Monday, the second day of 
July, 1923, the following, viz. : John 
Marshall ('Marney') Crosman and 
John Roots, counsellors ; Walter 
Huston ('Pete') Lillard, C. of I.; 
James Williamson ('Jim') Henning, 
Phil Beckwith, John Norman 
('Johnny') Curtis, Edgar ('Ruby') 
Church, Henry Crane ('Sonny') 
Hollister, Roderick ('Rod') Beebe, 
Franklin Cator, and Lawrence Ed- 
ward ('Larry') Tracy, boys, set 
forth for Cliff Island, a small, rocky 
piece of land near the western shore 
of Newfound Lake. After a short 
easy trip they arrived and, having 
set up a commissary tent, stocked 
it with provisions from the skiff 
which they had brought with them. 
After their noon meal they set off, 
led by Mr. Crosman, and at Cres- 
cent Beach the 'Boston Garters,' 
captained by 'Pete' Lillard, defeated 
the 'Fireman's Suspenders,' mar- 
shalled by 'Marney' Crosman, in a 
thrilling game of water-baseball. 
The party spent a peaceful night, 
lulled to sleep by the 'whispering 



pines and the lapping of the waters.' 
"On Tuesday morning a light rain 
prevented heavy activities. A for- 
aging party, consisting of Mr. Cros- 
man and 'Jim' Henning set out, and 
upon their return a second one, con- 
sisting of Lillard and Henning, de- 
parted in search of chickens for a 
feast on the following Thursday. 
That afternoon the 'Fireman's Sus- 
penders' staged a 'come-back' and 
defeated the 'Boston Garters,' 4 to 
1. After supper a campfire was 
built on the cliff and enjoyed by the 
party until bedtime. 




Photograph by W. H. Lillard, Jr. 

MARNLY DID THL COOKING 



"After the visit of the Doctor, 
Wednesday morning, John Roots 
and one John Curtis paddled across 
the lake to Archibald Tyler's for 
lard and other needed provisions. 
The rest of the party lolled and 
basked in the sun, amused and en- 
lightened by the wit and sage say- 
ings of Lillard, Beckwith, and Hen- 
ning. After a meal of novelty and 



26 



THE PASOUANEV ANNUAL 



invention, engineered by Chef Cros- 
man, a water baseball game was 
conducted between the Cliff Island 
party and the aggregation from 
Belle, the latter assisted by a gen- 
tleman of large and pink propor- 
tions. That evening a repast was 
seiwed fit to please a king. Later 
we ended a 'safe and sane' Fourth 
by watching the fireworks flash 
around the lake. 




Best Camper: Henning. 

Most Helpful: Beekwith. 

Camp Wit: Henning. 

Camp Half-Wit: Beekwith. 

Most Inventive: Hollister. 

"The following morning the party 
packed their accoutrements and left 
Cliff Island for their home Camp." 



Statement in behalf of the Accused : 
"John Marshall Crosman had per- 
mission for himself and party from 
the owners of Cliff Island to use it ; 
therefore charges of trespassing 
cannot be maintained. The counsel 
can find nothing incriminating in 
his report and therefore on behalf 
of his client, pleads not guilty to 
the charges of disorderly conduct." 
Drawn up by 

J. W. Henning, 3rd, 
P. V. Beekwith. 



Photograph by W. T. Carleton 

THE. KIDDILS VISIT THE. CAMPING 
PARTIES 



CAMP LETHARGY 



"Thursday morning Lillard, Beek- 
with and Henning went 'henning' 
(chicken catching) and procured 
three delectable fowls ( ?). The 
afternoon was again spent in a 
water baseball game which Belle 
won, however, by treacherous and 
illegal means. That night the 
party's disappointment was ap- 
peased in a most effective manner 
by the final feast. After the dinner 
statistics were the order, and the 
!< >11< >wing were voted : 



Our glorious camp consisted of 
the following celebrities: "Bill" 
Scull and "Bob" Rob'bins were our 
counsellors; and "Dave" Hinchman, 
"Cog" Lindsay, "Pretty Dan" Cod- 
man, "Baltimore" Follis, "Fatty" 
Fitler, "Teddy" Scull, "Gibby" Mc- 
llvaine, and "Joe" Yetterlein com- 
pleted the party. 

But a few minutes after our de- 
parture from Camp in the Stella 
we arrived at Sanborn's Point. 
When we had settled ourselves and 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



27 



prepared for a most enjoyable week 
we enjoyed a soak. We spent the 
afternoon at Sanborn's Beach, play- 
ing in, around, and on the water. 
Every one went to bed early after 
hearing one of "Bob's" weird and 
gruesome tales, only to be disturbed 
by the nocturnal visit of some wan- 
dering pilgrims (?). 

We arose late the following day 
after a restless night spent in elud- 
ing mosquitoes. As breakfast was 
not completed until twelve-thirty 
we decided to forego dinner. The 
whole party, with the exception of 
"Bob" and "Cog" who went forag- 
ing for supplies, spent the afternoon 
up the Cockermouth, fishing and 
frogging. After supper "Joe" and 
"Gibby" succeeded in catching some 
five fish of various size and quality. 
Once again we went to bed early, 
being well put to sleep ( ?) by an- 
other of "BobY'stories. 

"Reveille" was late on the Fourth, 
and so we consumed breakfast and 
lunch together as usual. At noon 
"Joe" and "Bob" left in search of 
supplies, and the afternoon passed 
rapidly while we soaked, paddled, 
and fished. An attempt to catch 
four minks, which we discovered 
while looking for firewood, utterly 
failed, although the attempt pro- 
vided plenty of excitement. In the 
evening we sat around a campfire 
on the point, and watched the fire- 
works of the other camps about the 
lake. 

We arose on Thursday at the 




Photograph by F. O. Reed 

"I'VE. LOST MY TOOTH BRUSH' 



usual hour, and busied ourselves 
with soaking, paddling, and canoe- 
tests. In the mid-afternoon the 
party broke up into three groups. 
"Bob," "Joe," and "Dan" went up 
the Cockermouth to fish ; "Bill," 
"Ted," and "Cog" set out to pro- 
cure chickens, and "Dave," "Gibby," 
"Fatty," and "Baltimore" remained 
in camp. We all assembled again 
about five o'clock for our final feed. 
Later we had campfire ; and after 
selecting a suitable name for our 
camp, we voted the following sta- 
tistics : 

Best Camper: Lindsay. 

Most Helpful : Follis, Codman. 



28 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Sea-Horse : Mellvaine. 

Most Bovine: Mcllvaine. 
Most Verdant: Fitler. 

Most Thoroughly Practical: W. 
S. Scull. 

It was with distinct regret that we 
broke camp on the following morn- 
ing, took a last soak, and made 
ready for the Stella. 

E. C. Lindsay, Jr., 
D. B. Hinchman. 



CAMP STARVATION 



(D'Artagnan does a service for the 
King, and is rewarded.) 

" Tis fitting, dear Aramis," began 
D'Artagnan, "that you should first 
of all know that for reasons of state 
His Majesty shall be known in this 
tale as the Duke of Bridgewater." 

So saying D'Artagnan flung him- 
self at full length on a luxurious 
couch and proceeded as follows : 

" 'Twas near midnight as I stepped 
into the cabinet of Monseigneur the 
Cardinal, in answer to a hasty sum- 
mons, and stood waiting, — watching 
with eager interest the pale but 
striking features of My Lord Riche- 
lieu de Jacques-Son, the first man 
in the kingdom save only His Grace 
of Bridgewater. 

"'Do you go,' commanded His 
Eminence, looking me over the 
while, 'with the party of the Eng- 
lishman, the Skipper Macomber, 
far to the south. Proceed to the 




Photograph by T. H. Hinchman, Jr. 

"THE. SKIPPER MACOMBLR" 



Isle of Mayhews ; and at the end of 
the fifth day return and report to 
me.' 

"This last I took for a dismissal, 
and so, bowing low, I retired. Our 
scouts were few in number, but 
their bravery and fine spirit made 
them worth full two score of the 
present-day men-at-arms. Our 

roll-call had the following names: 
'Bonny Bob' Gray, 'English Ivy' 
Lee, 'Auto-Strap' Treddy White, 
'Uncle Dobbin' Xewlin, 'Towser' 
McCarthv, 'Dutch Ned' Wurst, 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



29 



'Trotting Jack' Clarke, and 'Sea- 
Horse Eddie' Hawes. 

"In truth we had little enough of 
fighting; what of it we did was, 
in fact, but in play among our- 
selves. On the first day and on 
two others also I stood upon a 
raft that our carpenters had right 
cunningly prepared, and held off 
all comers. This I did alone, 
save only that one 'Dobbin' aided 
me, and the Skipper right gener- 
ously refrained from the attack, 
thereby giving the more practice to 
our scouts. Fine sport it was too, 
as set upon by galley and canoe I 
gaily tossed the valiant 'English 
Ivy' and his followers to the waves. 
But once, to say truth, they over- 
powered me, and I felt the water. 

"One night a great cry rent the 
air. I drew my sword and dashed 
to the woods. Here I beheld the 
valiant Skipper soundly beating the 
life from a great adder, a beast 
whose presence I had not even sus- 
pected. We all stepped in, how- 
ever, and in a short interval silence 
again reigned- 

"Then full often did the Skipper 
gather our scouts together and re- 
gale them with the game of Base- 
on-Ball. 'Tis a fine game, and 
much time we spent upon it. 

"Faith, for food we labored lust- 
ily, making ever and again a voyage 
to the mainland to the Office of the 
Post at Bridgewater, for sustenance 
and supplies. Our final feast satis- 



fied even the most hungry of us. 
'Dutch Ned' himself was full! 
Thereon some information did the 
Skipper and I gather, thus : 

Best Camper: 'Bonny Bob' Gray. 

Most Helpful : 'English Ivy' Lee. 

Sea-Horse : 'Eddie' Hawes. 

Pretty Boy: 'Sea-Horse Eddie' 
Hawes. 

"Then on Friday morning we 
broke camp and returned right 
sadly over the sea to our native 
shores. 

"Twas by order of His Emi- 
nence, dear Aramis, that one week 
later I was decorated with the white 
ribbon of the Illustrious Order of 
Old-Wad. For the service of the 
King," said D'Artagnan in closing, 
"is always suitably rewarded." 

T. H. Hinchman, Jr. 



THE MAYHEW AFFAIR 



(From Sax Rohmer) 

The other day as I sat in my 
cozy chambers, the door swung 
open before my eyes and in sprang 
Nayland Smith. 

"Quick, Petrie!" he gasped: 
"They're ahead of us already, the 
yellow devils !" 

He rushed out into the street with 
me in tow and dragged me to the 
nearby station. "I'll tell you the 
story in the train," he said, as he 



3° 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



rushed from the ticket booth, paste- 
boards in hand. 



"It's that fiend, Fu Manchu, 
Petrie," said Smith, once we were 
on the train and speeding toward 
New Hampshire. "He has lured a 
group of unsuspecting souls on to 
Mavhew's Island. With them goes 
the Doctor's diabolical assistant, 
Jak Turn-Sun — " 

"What!" I snorted, " not the Jak 
who was involved in the affair of 
the 'Aspirant H'?" 

"The same," returned my com- 
panion. 

"But what is Fu Manchu's pur- 
pose?" 

"He's trying to strike at the heart 
of the hated white race by remov- 
ing- — yes, murdering, Petrie — some 



i 


HrTZ 




jj^fly * tfrl^ffei? 


mP 





Photograph by F. O. Reed 

VICTIMS OF THL MAYHLW AFFAIR 



oi the most prominent Caucasians 
of the day. Listen to the names: 
There is Prof. Edouard Jackson— 



"The summer school magnate 
and finance king?" 

"The very one : also Wallace 
Ritchie (from the West), Thorn 
King, (the motor-boat baron, 
Petrie), F. O. Reed (a leader of the 
Boy Scout movement), De La Cour, 
Samuel Codman, Louis Jefferson, 
Fobes, Deacon, Robert Gowing, 
and Mr. Jack Munro, a visiting 
cigar magnate. You see, Petrie? 
Each one great — in his way." 

"But how will Fu Manchu con- 
trive their deaths?" 

"It's a poison plot: Jak Tum-Sioi 
is going to cook ! The party set out 
Monday morning, preceded by Jak 
and King (check, Petrie). A 
plunge into the lake was followed 
by lunch. Several received mys- 
terious wounds in the afternoon, 
and later King took a small party 
out in his yacht while others con- 
structed a wharf. After supper — 
still no attempt on Jak's part — they 
all gathered about a campfire : then 
to bed. 

"The following day was unevent- 
ful except for a trip which Jak 
made in an improvised sailing canoe, 
the invention of a weird Chinese 
game called Blackball, and a wild 
yachting expedition through a 
heavy sea. Wednesday passed with 
an exultant lack of action on the 
part of the campers, a motorboat 
trip up Fowler's River in the after- 
noon being the only act of impor- 
tance. Now it is Thursday, and at 
any moment Jak may strike. — Ah, 
here we are at Plymouth. Step 



HE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



3i 



into the conveyance, Petrie, and 
we'll be at Mavhew's in no time." 



"Evening, Petrie, and they're 
preparing for a feast. Stay here a 
minute while I get the lay of the 
land." 

Nayland Smith glided out ser- 
pentinely into the gathering dusk. 
For a moment his lithe form was 
silhouetted against the flickering 
cookfire ; then he disappeared. 

In about ten minutes he returned. 
"I'm on to Jak's plot," he choked; 
"Jak will strike later this evening, 
but I've fooled him." Smith's eyes 
glowed with excitement. "I've 
substituted Seidlitz powders for his 
poison !" 

Even as he spoke a series of 
cheers broke out from the direction 
of the distant campfire : "Ya-a- 
Best Camper, King! Most Help- 
ful, Bob Gowing! What? Most 
Cheerful, a tie?— Who? . . . De La 
Cour and Sam Codman. Ya-a-a-" 

"There," said Smith, turning, 
"the affair of Mayhew's Island may 
be considered over and Fu Manchu 
has been foiled again. We can be 
sure that all is well for the present, 
but, mark my words, Petrie, we've 
got to be on our guard against that 
jak Turn-Sun." 

R. B. Gowing. 



CAMP ALLMANSLAND 



(Harvard), B.U.M., (Tufts), Pro- 
fessor of Anthropology at O'Brion 
Institute of Walla Walla, Washing- 
ton, delivered before the Committee 
for Investigation of the Source of 
the Race appointed by the Council 
of the League of Nations.) 




(The following is the report of 
Dr. Gustave Dill Pickel, D.U.M., 



Photograph by J. W. Spaeth, Jr. 
DR. PICKLL DISCOVERS AN INTERESTING 
GROUP OF FA UNA 

"Gentlemen: With all modesty, I 
believe, I may rely upon your being 
wed acquainted with my unusual 
reputation, the sort of reputation 
which so few of our leading pro- 
fessional authorities possess or 
even claim to possess ! You all 
know how well my repute is 
substantiated by my justly cele- 
brated lineage ; you are aware 
that I am a scion of one of 
Europe's oldest families — 'where- 
e'er a Pickel stood, there moved a 
group of Europe's bluest beings' ! 
You all recall how one of the Pickels 
lost Calais for Queen Mary, how his 
son, after years of faithful service, 
was beheaded by a grateful mon- 
arch, and how — but I fear I digress 
from my subject in justifying my 
intellect by my ancestry. 



32 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



When my friend, Dr. Wilson, sent 
that urgent appeal — which I subse- 
quently answered— for a superior an- 
thropologist, I sensed that some- 
thing great was in store for Science. 
Nor was I deceived. Pursuing my in- 
vestigations in the month of July, 
1923, I found existing on Crescent 
Beach, Newfound Lake, a most in- 
teresting group of Fauna. The 
group evidently possessed the patri- 
archal form of government, being 
controlled by a Dux gcntis whose be- 
longings were marked by the singu- 
lar letter combination AKERS. 
The group was above the form of 
fetish worship, carrying with them 
their movable deity, a superior 
creature whose name, suggestive of 
that of the Peruvian sun-god Spoof, 
was SPAETH. (Does this sim- 
ilarity connect them with the 
Incas?) 

"There were nine individuals be- 
sides the god and the chief. Their 
tribal appellations were C. O. I. 
(meaning "Ceasing of Industry") 
Gowing, and tribesmen de Rham, 
Grant, Ef Harding, Jay Harding, 
Jay Hinchman, Bee McCarthy, 
Owen, and Ee Rakestraw. 

"When I first began my observa- 
tions, the tribe w'as performing 
its peculiar act of worship, whose 
ritual they term Nigger Baby. Their 
mode of eating, which was pur- 
sued after the worship, also- had 
points in common with the Inca 
practice. At night a conflagration 
was ignited. Our subjects then 



seemed to be much harassed by m- 
scctivac found abundant among 
lower organic forms (e. g., dogs). 

"On the second day all was much 
the same — three intakes of eatable 
matter, two prolonged baths, and a 
conflagration. But on the next day 
(Wednesday) our subjects re- 
ceived a visit from innumerable sim- 
ilar creatures who joined them in 
worship, constantly uttering such 
unintelligible cries as 'Play ball!' 
'Hurry, I'm freezing!' 'Crescent 
wins!' etc. (the last two were by 
far the most frequent). Then, in a 
primitive kind of foot-race, a fero- 
cious creature (one of the visitors) 
caused much pristine amusement 
by 'running the other way,' which 
seemed to me quite sensible. (Hush, 
gentlemen, I am nearly through). 
In the afternoon 'Hornet's' joined in 
further worship ; then followed an- 
other meal and fire. The following 
day presented nothing more novel 
until the evening, when a lengthy 
and riotous religious feast was in- 
dulged in by all. . . . Then on 
Friday morning the horde stole 
away, leaving the sands as bare as 
I, or Miss Wellington, could wish! 
But one curious thing I did find, a 
parchment which I finally deciph- 
ered as follows : 

'Best Camper Owen 

Most Helpful Hinchman 

Water Rat Ef Harding 

Cow AKERS' 

"With great reluctance I, G. Dill 
Pickel, must confess that I do not 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



33 



understand these strange beings. 
I can only surmise that they pos- 
sess rudimentary human instincts, 
even at their low stage of the scale 
of human development, that scale 
at whose summit is — but modesty 
silences me, gentlemen !" 

Translated for the lay mind by 
C. D. Gowing, 

Historian. 




Photograph by L. 5. Wilson 

MR. NE.D'5 NLW MOTOR BOAT 



MAE MURRAY INN 



(a Red Squirrel's Account) 

"While flitting through the trees 
at Hornet's Cove one day last July, 
I was startled to see a gang of en- 
thusiastic young humans pitching 
camp near my home. Having noth- 
ing better to do and feeling in the 
vacation mood myself, I watched 
the party all week and soon be- 
came acquainted with them. There 
were Johnnie Rakestraw, Dick 
Berresford, Chas. Goodrich, George 
Brewster, Guy of Gisbourne 



Murchie, Bolt Winpenny, Baz Hen- 
ning, Whit Hoyt, and Bill Harris. 
Two others, called Udo Bradley 
and Dave Grant, were occasionally 
consulted for permission to use the 
canoes ; so I conclude that they were 
care-takers. 

"In the course of the very first 
day, a few, whom I immediately 
spotted as the hard workers of the 
party, built a campfire, around 
which, in the evening, Dave read 
aloud about Cleek, the detective. 
There were protesting yells at the 
rapid rate of reading which Dave 
pursued ; apparently he did not en- 
joy the story himself. That night 
the mosquitoes swarmed so thickly 
that Udo was forced to sleep with 
his head in a pillow case. About 
midnight I succeeded in purloining 
a bit of the bread supply ; but there- 
after this stingy party kept a pile 
of rocks nearby, and I was forced 
to remain at a safe distance. 

"All the next day they seemed 
to loll around. In the morning, 
and every morning afterwards, a 
fellow came ashore to attend the 
sick. I didn't catch his name, but 
I noticed that in his presence every- 
body seemed to talk about a 'dock.' 
At night some of the boys stole 
across to Cliff Island to dodge the 
mosquitoes ; but this proved to be 
foolish, since the wind came up 
later and cleared out the insects. 

On Wednesday morning the party 
won a triangular track meet on 
Crescent Beach. Their Cliff rivals 



34 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



brought up the rear. That after- 
noon 1 took the wife with me to the 
beach and watched our visitors trim 
the Crescents, 1-0, for the Water 
Baseball Championship. Mrs. 

Squirrel is usually not fond of 
Sports, but here she was very much 
impressed by the superb skill of the 
Hornet's team. Later in the day 
Udo and Bolt paddled over to 
Bridgewater for some ice cream, 
which did not 'eat well' ; for, al- 
though many pretended to enjoy it, 
1 saw some bury their portions in 
the sand. 




Photograph by W. Mc. Harris, Jr. 
THE. PARTY 

"Thursday's activities were va- 
ried. Brewster, Murchie, a n d 
Goodrich chopped wood, the latter 
singing hymns meanwhile in order 
to discourage the others. Bill Har- 
ris wallowed in the water, Udo and 
Dick slept joyously, and Dave, 
John, and Bolt jazzed restlessly 
around. My heart ached that night 
as I watched them all busy at their 
big feed. Not a crumb was left! 



\\ hen it was over they passed com- 
pliments around: Goodrich was 
voted Best Camper, Brewster Most 
Helpful, and Win penny Most Cheer- 
ful. Then Dave, John, Bolt, and 
Dick awoke the echoes with riotous 
song, and succeeded (blast them!) 
in keeping the baby awake all night. 
"On Friday morning I was more 
than glad to see the whole outfit 
board their yacht and depart. It 
is really quite fortunate for me that 
I am able to write this account at 
all ; for several times I was in immi- 
nent danger when I endeavored to 
take away a mere morsel of their 
bread for the family. How incon- 
siderate these human beings are ! 
Why, by the Great Horned Owl. 
here comes another crowd ! I won- 
der if—" 

Translated into English by 

R. C Berresford. 



CAMP WIZITORZ-PARYDICE 



( Being extracts from the diary of 
a canoe) 

Monday, July 9: 12 noon. This 
is the first moment I've had to 
write. Everything has been hap- 



peninj 



From the moment before 



reveille this morning when I was 
seized and tagged "Sagebeer-Cod- 
man Party — Cliff" until a few min- 
utes ago when I was dumped on 
the beach here, 1 have suffered the 
most agonizing manhandling. Now 
I find myself stranded on a deserted 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



35 



isle with eleven uncouth males. As 
far as I can learn, the names of 
these people are ''Dick" Sagebeer 
and "Elyut" Codman, counsellors; 
"Pinkie" Murchie, a thing called a 
C. O. L; and "Ting" Miller, "Kang" 
Lloyd, "Johnny" Howland, "Drool- 
er" Bankson, "Squirt" Thompson, 
"Squirrel' Lindsay, "Dave" Hart, 
and "Kit" Jefferson. 

I :30 P. M. The campers have 
had a "soak," during which they 
sank me to the bottom of the lake 
and bounced on me. Think of it ! 
They have succeeded also in getting 
settled for a stay, and have had 
lunch. 

5:00 P. M. This seems to be a 
very popular place. The campers 
were visited by a delegation from 
Hornet's and Mayhew's early in the 
afternoon. 

7 :00 P. M. For supper the party 
had some brown stuff called by 
them "Marney toast." (I'm glad 
I'm not a human being!) Don is 
now telling the others a few stories. 

10:45 P. M. Taps. Now for 
some peace ! 

Tuesday, July 10: 5:30 A. M. 
Roused by those pesky mosquitoes 
and noisy brats on the cliff. 

10:00 A. M. Everybody seems 
to be sleeping around this morning. 

II :00 A. M. The wind has been 
rising steadily. The campers took 
me around the island to a sheltered 
cove where they held trials for a 
swimming meet with the Crescent 
party. 



2:00 P- M. Was taken over to 
Crescent ; but the Crescentites de- 
clined the swimming challenge on 
claims of rough water and cold air. 
It is my personal belief that their 
real reasons were fear and laziness. 

2:30 P. M. A treasure hunt has 
been started. Somebody has the 
treasure but nobody knows who. 
Everyone is under suspicion. Who- 
ever is the possessor at five o'clock 
wins. 




Photograph by R. G. Sagebeer 

THE. GUARDIANS OF THE. CANOL 



5:00 P. M. Nobody wins. 
"Hunt" Miller had the treasure but 
lost it. What silly brats! 

8.00 P. M. The island has been 
invaded by mosquito-harassed bar- 
barians from Hornet's and Crescent 
Beach. This is a veritable visitor's 
paradise ! 

Wednesday, July 11: 8:00 A. M. 
Campers arose late ; getting sen- 
sible ! 

11 :C0 A. M. Was taken to Cres- 
cent again. After much hullabaloo 



36 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



the congregation of camping parties 
arranged a baseball game between 

Cliff and Crescent. II ornet's 
looked on. 'Idle score at the end of 
the third inning was 4-3 in favor of 
our opponents; they then refused to 
continue and claimed a victory. 
Next came a triangular track meet. 
The principal feature was a coun- 
sellors' race in which Dick Sage- 
beer and a black-whiskered man 
named Udo starred. My campers 
lost by only one point. I was cru- 
elly mauled in the hurdle race. 

3 :C0 P. M. Another queer treas- 
ure hunt. 




Photograph by R. G. Sagebeer 

A MLRRY ME.AL! 



5:00 P. M. These campers of 
mine are extremely stupid. An ex- 
convict named Kang held the treas- 
ure the entire time but didn't know 
it. Still, 1 can hardly blame him: 
it was an onion ! 

Thursday, July 12: 2:00 P. M. 
M v campers loafed around all morn- 




Photograph by U. T. Bradley 

THE. CIRCUS 15 COMING! 



ing. Now they are swimming over 
to Belle Isle, but I don't know why. 

2:30 P. M. A party of girls has 
arrived on Belle. Everyone, in- 
cluding Gus Bankson and Squirt, is 
brushing up and showing off. The 
campers have planned to kidnap the 
Doctor. 

7:00 P. M. The kidnapping at- 
tempt was a fluke : the Doc didn't 
come. The party has just been 
gorging. What a banquet ! 

8:00 P. M. Weird stories on the 
Cliff. 

Friday, July 13: 12 noon. I'm 
elad to be back home. My friend, 
the lantern, told me the camp sta- 
tistics as he heard them : 
Best Camper "Ting" Miller 

Most Helpful "Johnny" Howland 
W r ater Rat "Drooler" Bankson 

Most Thoughtful "Ting" Miller 
Story Teller "Don" Murchie. 

Donald Murchie, 

Historian. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



37 



WATER SPORTS OF 1923 




Photograph by A. W. Moody 

THE. 5E.NIOR EXHIBITION CRLW 



To do one's best in each and 
every competition and thus to gain 
a moral victory if not an actual one 
seems to have been the spirit in the 
atmosphere during the two weeks 
of Water Sports preliminaries and 
finals. For a boy to learn to take 
victory modestly and to take de- 
feat smilingly, after having exerted 
his best efforts, is to make a decided 
step towards fine sportsmanship. 

Realization of ambition after hard 
and constant work towards that 
end is the just reward for labors, 
inspiring self-confidence, and assur- 
ance. To win fairly brings courage 



to undertake enterprises of greater 
consequence. Every success is a 
gateway to further progress. There 
is no failure for him who has done 
his best : each whole-hearted at- 
tempt brings all goals nearer. To 
lose to a more skilled opponent must 
bring the determination to improve, 
to try again, and to win the next 
time. 

All manly competitions bring out 
the courage of the competitors. 
This characteristic was much in evi- 
dence on this day, shown not only 
on the part of the boys but also by 
the large number of guests who put 



38 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 




Photograph by A. W. Moody 

THL JUNIOR EXHIBITION CRLW 



up with the inclemency of the 
weather and smilingly and appre- 
ciatively watched from the rain- 
soaked platform. Rain greeted us 
that morning and continued steadily 
and strenuously throughout the day. 
This unpleasantness did not mar 
the events of the day but perhaps 
even added to its successes. 

The competitions were remark- 
ably keen and hard-fought. Swim- 
ming races were won by a hand, 
canoe races by less than a half 
length, and other events by a nar- 
row margin of a few points. Don- 
ald Murchie for his excellent all- 
around participation and fine sports- 
manship deserves high commenda- 
tion. "Joe" Yetterlein proved the 



biggest surprise of the day by win- 
ning the 100-yards swim from such 
opponents as Howland, "Don" 
Murchie and Winpenny. General 
Excellence was awarded to "Billy" 
Winstead with five points for his 
fine diving and two more points for 
second place in the Junior 50-yards 
swim. With excellent cooperation 
by counsellors and boys, the events 
moved along with smoothness and 
precision. A summary of the re- 
sults of the various events is printed 
in another part of this volume. 

The Annual Water Sports Plays 
followed the supper served in Me- 
morial Hall. The manner in which 
"The Crimson Cocoanut" and "Po- 
litical Promises" were produced 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



39 



showed signs of many hours of 
painstaking rehearsal and the result 
of the tireless efforts of Mr. Lodge. 
Our guests seemed to enjoy the 
Camp singing in Baird Hall, which 
was followed by the presentation 
of the prizes. 

The mid-season milestone was 



passed gloriously, proving effect- 
ively what can be accomplished by 
interest and enthusiasm, persever- 
ance and co-operation, in a few short 
weeks of a normal Pasquaney sea- 
son. 

J. M. Crosman. 




Photograph by F. B. Hufnagel, Jr. 

AN INTERESTING WATER 5PORT5 TILTING MATCH 



CANOEING 



This season the Canoe and Life- 
Saving Tests have been consider- 
ably interfered with by the numer- 
ous other activities as well as by 
the cold weather conditions during 
the latter part of the summer. Sta- 
tistics show that twenty-five boys 



have passed their Canoe Tests and 
nineteen their Life-Saving Tests. 

The list of those who have at- 
tained Canoe Privilege upon vote 
of the Council is as follows : Berres- 
ford, Goodrich, Henning J., Hinch- 
man D., Howland, Lillard, and 
Murchie D. 

W. S. Scull, 2nd. 



4Q 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



DRAMATICS IN 1923 




Photograph by F. O. Reed 

5CLNL FROM "THF_ CRIMSON COCOANUT' 



In writing a summary of the dra- 
matic season at Camp this past sum- 
mer there are two major considera- 
tions to be discussed. In the first 
place, was the season a success from 
the point of view of dramatic art? 
And, in the second place, was it suc- 
cessful in providing real enjoyment 
to the boys At first sight it might 
seem difficult to reconcile these two 
views and still be able to call the 
season a genuine success. Some 
might pronounce the possibility of 
a season's being successful in both 
respects a paradox. While such per- 
sons might well be regarded as good 
criterions of the drama, yet thev 



might easily underestimate the sen- 
sibilities of a crowd of boys in rela- 
tion to dramatics. Here at Pas- 
quaney, not only because of the 
superior class of our boys, but also 
because of the interest of Mr. Ned, 
both these views may easily be har- 
monized. 

Throughout the history of the 
Camp, dramatics have occupied an 
important position. This state of 
serious interest originated, like all 
other interests here, in Mr. Ned. 
In 1895, the year the Camp was be- 
gun, a play was given in Dana Hall. 
Ever since there have been dra- 
matic productions ; and today, as a 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



4i 



sequel, we have an ever-increasing 
interest both in the Saturday night 
entertainments and in the Water 
Sports plays. 

It might appear that we had 
reached a pinnacle of success in our 
dramatic attempts, — that the boys 
would turn to other activities at the 
expense of dramatics and that, in 
general, the standard would be low- 
ered. But instead of half-hearted 
interest, with a fundamental feeling 
of boredom, there has developed a 
keen and conscientious interest, a 
high tone of appreciation, founded 
on the rock of twenty-nine years' 
effort encouraged by the guiding 
spirit of Pasquaney — Mr. Ned. Yet 
never has this been a burden : were 
that the case, all thoughts of dra- 
matics might speedily be relegated 
to the limbo of oblivion. On the 
contrary Mr. Ned has inspired the 
boys with a keen, intelligent desire 
to act and to understand dramatics. 
So we may say that in producing 
work of considerable ability and ar- 
tistic quality, the boys have had a 
most successful season and have 
pleased everyone. 

When we come to consider the 
actual mechanics that were handled 
this year preparatory to the per- 
formances we think at once of two 
men whose help was invaluable. 
Mr. Robbins displayed his custom- 
ary tact, perseverance, and energy 
during rehearsals. The artful yet 
natural manner in which he imper- 
sonated many different roles served 



as an ever-refreshing model for the 
actors to copy. No less helpful but 
along other lines was Mr. Thomp- 
son. "Jack" was there, all right ! 
He helped during rehearsals and in 
the making-up of characters. The 
field in which he particularly 
starred, however, was that of stage 
setting. The scenery in the Water 
Sports plays, conceded to be good, 
owes a large portion of its excel- 
lence to him. And then, of course, 
"Jack" was forever "cracking wise" ; 
but we'll save that for later. 

On June 28th the season opened 
with an impromptu production or- 
ganized by Mr. Robbins. Kelly 
Anthony was the most conspicuous 
performer, and thereby may have 
starred ; but the general opinion was 
that "Larry Seaman," as conceived 
by "Hunt" Miller, was the outstand- 
ing figure in contributing to the en- 
joyment of the evening. "Hunt" 
showed the allcgrcssc of mind and 
body that he exhibits not only on 
the stage but at all times. 

The following week the Stay-at- 
Homes were kept very busy both 
with rehearsing for the Water 
Sports and with preparing for the 
minstrel show that was staged the 
next Saturday. This attempt at 
colored wit and mannerisms met 
with enthusiastic applause from the 
returning campers. Every minstrel 
had his fun, but I think "Jack" may 
rightly be pronounced the hit of the 
evening, — though why he didn't get 
hit is still a mystery to all ! He 



42 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



"'ragged" the campers as well as his 
many harmonicas, and ran all the 

other minstrels ragged. 

Then the Stay-at-Homes became 
campers and the campers became 
Stay-at-Homes. Accordingly, the 
following Saturday a scorching 
come-back was witnessed by the 
Camp in the form of "Abdulla-Bul- 
Bul-Amir," which was a fitting re- 
ply to "Mr. Gallager and Mr. 
Shean" of the week previous. Both 
were replete with sparkling wit and 
keen humor. "Lost but Found," 
though slap-stick to an extreme, 
contained some able characteriza- 
tions. "Jimmy" Henning portrayed 
to perfection the deaf, cranky old 
"hick"; and "Bobby" Nields was 
delightfully natural as the naughty, 
fresh, outspoken little boy. 

The entertainment a week later 
consisted of a dialogue creditably 
given by "Don" Murchie and 
"Hunt" Miller, and also a mono- 
logue by "Don" Murchie. Both 
were well received, and both boys 
deserve much praise for their spon- 
taneous efforts in organizing an 
eleventh-hour vaudeville program. 

On July 28th the two Water 
Sports plays were produced in the 
Theatre. The first, as a curtain- 
raiser, was a farce in two scenes en- 
titled "Political Promises"; the sec- 
ond play, which formed the feature 
of the program, was a comedy in 
one act by Tan Hay Beith, entitled 
"The Crimson Cocoanut." 

The plot of the first play centers 



about a candidate for mayor who 
does a lot of underhanded election- 
eering, finally securing his election 
by means of the German, Negro, 
Jewish, and Italian votes. When 
those who canvassed for his election 
come to seek their promised re- 
wards, Mr. Beet, the mayor, tells 
Willie, his office boy, to "put them 
out." But finally, having refused 
the stipulated reward to Willie him- 
self, he is reduced to insignificance 
by having to give in to Willie's 
threats of letting the disappointed 
men into the office. The cast was 
as follows : 

John Beet, candidate for Mayor 

Edwin W. Ritchie 
W'illis, his office boy 

William Winstead 
Adolphus Spiegelburger, a German 
Daniel S. Codman 
George Washington Andrew Jack- 
son Thomas Jefferson Brown 

James W. Henning 
Isidore Cohenstein, a Hebrew- 
Ivy L. Lee, Jr. 
Giuseppe Bacigalupi, an Italian 

James B. Ames 

Considering the trivialty and 
childishness of this play, one may 
safely say that the parts were all 
ably executed. Each character was 
well conceived by the actor, and the 
play met with due appreciation. 
Edwin Ritchie, in the principle role 
of the Mayor, did a praiseworthy 
piece of work, interpreting the part 
most intellierently. "Billy" Win- 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



43 




Photograph by J. C. Thompson 

FINAL SCENE. IN "POLITICAL PROMISES' 



stead showed all his natural pres- 
ence of mind and fortitude in his im- 
personation of the office boy. His 
interpretation was adequate, and he 
was deservedly given a hearty hand 
by the captivated audience. "Dan" 
Codman as the German politician, 
Ivy Lee as the Jew swindler, and 
"Jimmy" Ames as the excitable, 
sentimental Italian, all deserve men- 
tion. They showed considerable 
imagination and conveyed a vividly 
real impression of the crooked office- 
seeker. "Jimmy" Henning, how- 
ever, as the negro crook, deserves 
special mention. Though the part 
of the colored profligate in itself 
was not outstanding, nevertheless 
"Jimmy" raised it far above its level 
and made a great deal out of very 
little. His natural deftness in act- 
ing negro parts and speaking negro 
dialect was conspicuous ; to this he 



added the nonchalent, boorish man- 
ner of the negro, and effectively 
combining these good qualities, 
cleverly put his part across the foot- 
lights. 

The plot of "The Crimson Cocoa- 
nut," though simple and elementary, 
is more involved than that of "Polit- 
ical Promises." The synopsis of the 
play is, briefly, as follows : A Rus- 
sian anarchist and his wife come to 
Spaghetti's Restaurant, Soho, with 
a disguised bomb. This they trust 
to the waiter, who considers him- 
self rather superior and, in fact, is 
not as stupid as he looks. Mean- 
while a detective, on their trail, has 
come to the restaurant and searched 
it. Accidentally he encounters here 
a girl of whom he is very fond. She 
has come to the restaurant with her 
cranky uncle. With the assistance 
of the waiter, the detective succeeds 



44 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



in getting the bomb, which is known 

as the Crimson Cocoanut, and later 
in capturing the Russian criminals. 
The reward for this capture is divid- 
ed between the waiter and the de- 
tective; the former can now marry 
his beloved, the dish-breaking cook, 
and the detective obtains permis- 
sion from the disagreeable uncle to 
marry the charming niece. The 
cast of this play was: 

Xitro Gliserinsky, an anarchist 

Donald Murchie 
Madame Gliserinsky 

George W. Brewster 
Mr. Jabstick John Howland 

Nancy Jabstick, his daughter 

Robert B. Gowung 
Jack Pincher, of Scotland Yard 

Huntington Miller 
Robert, waiter at Spaghetti's 

Charles D. Gowing 

Scene, Spaghetti's Restaurant, Soho 



Stage Manager John L. Rakestraw 
Electrician and Property Man 

Frank O. Reed 
Stage Hands 

Francis A. Harding 
Richard C. Berresford 

Taken as a whole "Idle Crimson 
Cocoanut" was most successful. 
The actors were well fitted to the 
parts, and the ensemble was good. 
Each character made a good stage 
presence and showed an intelligent 
sense of position and graceful stag- 
ing. It is hard to say which one 
was outstanding, so well rounded 



was the entire production. But if 
some differentiation should be made, 
Charles Gowing must, in my opin- 
ion, merit the highest commenda- 
tion. He did a magnificent piece 
of work and showed throughout the 
concentrated study that he had 
made of his part. From beginning 
to end the audience saw the super- 
cilious, sleepy, casual, dirty waiter, 
seedy-looking and displaying a pro- 
found contempt for his calling. 
This was a long part, difficult to 
memorize; but "Charlie" knew his 
lines and stage business to perfec- 
tion and so was able to turn all his 
attention to the fine points. George 
Brewster, as the sedate but wily 
Russian criminal, did a really artis- 
tic job. His mannerisms were 
stealthy and subtly ominous. "Don" 
Murchie was most realistic as the 
flagitious and aggressive Russian 
husband. He was the toof of his 
more diplomatic and cautious wife, 
and was a really terrible looking 
person. Mr. Jabstick was ably 
acted by John Howland, who en- 
tered into the part with a certain 
ease and considerable gusto. He 
gave one a vivid picture of the iras- 
cible old English gentleman who 
never misses a chance to harp on 
some trivial detail. "Bob" Gow- 
ing was the piquante ingenue, the 
stupid, flirtatious daughter of Mr. 
Jabstick. He deserves great credit 
for the natural and versatile talent 
which he displayed. Jack Pincher, 
the detective, was acted with great 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



45 



skill by "Hunt" Miller, who kept 
the audience guessing throughout. 

The succeeding Saturday night 
contained a great surprise for us. 
We were first moved to bursts of 
laughter by the mimic Council meet- 
ing, and especially by "Hunt" Mil- 
ler's realistic representation of 
"Hurry Harry." "Hunt" did not 
stop at that ; in the next two acts of 
slap-stick comedy he showed great 
versatility in taking the part, first, 
of a Swedish janitor and, then, of a 
Bowery girl. When we come to 
think of it, there is a certain differ- 
ence between these three character 
parts. 

Though the Long Walk, the Car- 
digan Walk, and the camping parties 
had kidnapped most of the talent in 
Camp, on August 11th "Jack" 
Thompson, "Dave" Grant, and 
"Bob" Gowing amused us, showing 
their characteristic originality in a 
"radio" program through which we 
heard many interesting facts. On 



the last Saturday of the dramatic 
season we all witnessed a thrilling 
melodrama, written and acted by 
the Pasquaney Stock Company. 
Everyone was thrilled to the core 
by "Don" Murchie's remarkable act- 
ing in the part of the maniac. 
George Brewster gave a convincing 
impression of idiocy and absurdity, 
while "Bob" Gowing and "Hunt" 
Miller both were paragons of melo- 
dramatic acting. 

The return next year of much of 
our present talent and the possibil- 
ity of the appearance of stars among 
the new boys furnish hope of a fur- 
ther advance in dramatic interest. 
With the excellent equipment for 
stage effects that we possess in the 
Theatre and with the promised con- 
tinuance of enthusiasm in amateur 
acting, the plays should retain their 
paramount importance in our sum- 
mer and go on giving great pleasure 
to coming generations of campers. 
John Davis Lodge. 




Photograph by C. A. McCarthy, Jr. 

THE WALK TO MT. CARDIGAN 



4 6 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



THE WALKS 



Since the earliest ages men have 
depended on walking- as their funda- 
mental mode of locomotion. There- 
fore it is most fitting that we of a 
later age should learn and practise 
that which was so very necessary 
and valuable to our ancestors. But 
this is not entirely germane to the 
chief purpose of our walks at Pas- 
quaney. Of course there is the 
physical side, which takes into con- 
sideration the development of a 
boy's muscles, his powers of endur- 
ance, and altogether his general 
health and well-being. I have heard 
some maintain that to walk five 
miles for the sake of exercise is a 
waste of time, since the same 
amount of exercise can be obtained 
in a much shorter period by a 
more concentrated and violent 
form of exertion, such as running. 
I most certainly do not consider 
this argument to hold much water 
as far as we are concerned, be- 
cause we have this strenuous 
form of exercise in our sports 
as well as, on occasions, in our 
walks. Besides, there is a cer- 
tain robust something to be derived 
from tramping that one does not 
get from anything else. 

Our walks are graduated as to 
their length and difficulty so as to 
accommodate those boys who are 
taken on each walk. The first Sat- 



urday after Camp opened we went 
up "The Lane" to the Barnard 
Estate, where we had a good rest 
while enjoying a fine view of the 
northern portion of the lake and 
Mount Cardigan ; thence we came 
back by way of the Mayhew's Turn- 
pike and were refreshed by a swim 
in the lake. Since this was our 
first walk and we had covered only 
five and a half miles, almost all the 
boys were able to go. The next 
Saturday a smaller number hiked to 
Clement's Hill, where lunch was 
eaten and a magnificent view en- 
joyed of the White Mountains to 
the north of us as w r ell as of many 
of the surrounding lakes. It was 
with much interest that we viewed 
the Franconia Range, which later 
on some of us were destined to 
climb on the Long Walk. Again 
a swim at Camp ended another per- 
fect day. 

On the following Saturday, July 
14, we had a very hard and hot 
struggle through the woods to Ply- 
mouth Mountain, where, unfortu- 
nately, we were able to see little 
because of the smoke haze from for- 
est fires on the mountains. We en- 
joyed a good rest and some lunch, 
however, and then started back on 
a hard push through the under- 
growth, finally arriving at "Fuzzie" 
Kneeland's cottage, to be more than 
delighted guests at his lemonade 
treat. We had not had a drop to 
drink since we left Camp, and our 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



47 



gratitude to Mrs. Kneeland and 
"Fuzzie" was but poorly expressed 
by our cheers for them. 







w 


jg jMPWKKk 




Hi fl W^^U&u i ■• • - v* 1 







Photograph by I. L. Lee, Jr. (?) 

MR. NLD'5 WLLTON FALLS WALK 



Now for the Welton Falls walk ! 
On this particular Saturday three 
walks set out from Camp. One, 
composed of the smaller boys, and 
led by Mr. Spaeth, went to San- 
born's Beach in the afternoon. An- 
other Mr. Ned took across the lake 
and up the Post Road to Welton 
Falls. This party was all hearty 
in their praise of the walk, in spite 
of their finding the water at the 
Falls very low. The third party, 
which was made up of those boys 
who had survived the latest select- 
ing, set out to Hebron, from which 
point they described a great circle 
over the Groton hills through an 
ever-changing silvan paradise and 



found themselves back at Hebron ! 
Here several buckets-full of punch 
were imbibed. A merry ramble to 
Mr. Fred Jackson's house and a 
good swim while waiting for the 
"Rec" to take us back to Camp 
completed the last of our one-day 
walks. Thus, in preparing for the 
Long Walk, the hardening prelim- 
inary walks were in themselves a 
decided success. The Long Walk 
History will adequately furnish the 
details of our six-day hike to the 
Franconia Range. 

Even as the walks aid in physical 
development, so do they also stand 
for the development of the finer 
points in a boy's character, — man- 
liness, cheer, endurance, helpfulness, 
consideration ; in other words, we 
aim in the walks to help Pasquaney 
mould the characteristics which go 
to make up our conception of an 
American gentleman. 

In closing, I have only to say that 
to name the boy to whom the 
Thomas Hike Cup should be award- 
ed was not a light charge. There 
were many who met its qualifica- 
tions of "endurance, helpfulness, and 
cheer on the walks." But by a 
process of careful comparison it was 
unanimously agreed by the commit- 
tee of counsellors that the name to 
be engraved on the cup should be 
that of Richard C. Berresford. 

D. D. Kennedy. 



4 8 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



THE LONG WALK HISTORY, 1923 




Photograph by R. G. Sagebeer 

THL PARTY ON THE. FRANCONIA RANGE. 



THE PARTY 



Counsellors: Mr. Kennedy, Mr 
Macomber, Mr. Robbins, Mr. Sage 
beer, Mr. Scull. 

Boys: "Phil" Beckwith, "Dick' 
Berresford, George Brewster, "Dan' 
Codman, "Sam" Codman, John Cur 
tis, "Wids" De La Cour, "Tom' 
Eliot, "Charlie" Gowing, "Mooney' 
I larding, "Dave" Hinc h m a n 
"Bruno" Ilinchman, Thorn King 
[vv Lee, "Freddy" Leonard. Cald- 



well Lindsay, "Don" Murchie, Guy 
Murchie, "Eddie" Ritchie, "Treddy" 
White, "Bolt" Winpenny, a n d 
"Ned" Wurst. 

Monday, August 6 13 miles 
Just as our leader's watch ticked 
the twentieth minute after nine, the 
members of the "doggy" 1923 Long 
Walk, having given the customary 
cheers at Mr. Ned's house, swung 
up the lane on their prodigious pere- 
grination to Mt. Lafayette. We 
were slightly surprised to find, as 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



49 



we passed the Camp, that our send- 
off consisted entirely of unseen tink- 
ling cowbells ; but we knew that 
the boys were with us in spirit any- 
way and so went on undaunted. 




Photograph by I. L. Lee, Jr. 

SAMMY CODMAN CARRILD THE. FLAG 



For a while we trod familiar 
ground, and we hardly felt that the 
"real thing" had begun until the 
Barnard Estate had been left behind. 
We moved at a brisk pace through 
the woods on the new route to Ply- 
mouth discovered by Mr. Scull, 
and descended into the metropolis 
about noon. After a short halt we 
moved on, lunching in a grove about 
a mile from the town. At three 



o'clock we reached our camping 
place, and after setting up the tents 
(all but "Robbie's" !)we went down 
to Beebe Falls and staggered blind- 
ly through the long cave, or rather, 
tunnel, which (so "Don" said) had 
been dug by gold-seekers. After a 
prolonged dip under the falls and 
some fancy diving, we returned to 
supper. Then came a short ball 
game and bed under the stars. 

Tuesday, August 7 23 miles 

It was fortunate for Mr. Robbins' 
tent party that they had finally man- 
aged to erect their tent before they 
went to sleep. At about four A. M. 
"Dick" Sagebeer roused us up "in 
a manner quite effective" and hur- 
ried us into the tents out of a sud- 
den and surprising shower. The 
rain continued through breakfast, 
but then, having nicely laid the dust 
on the roads, it stopped, just as we 
commenced our day's march at half 
past eight. 

"Don" Kennedy must have 
thought we were all Joie Rays and 
Clarence de Mars that morning. He 
walked us at an "honest-to-good- 
ness" fast gait for four hours. We 
tore through Campton, Thornton, 
and West Thornton, and arrived at 
the Mountain Park House at 
twelve-thirty, so stiff that we could 
hardly move. But here we had a 
real rest. Some members of the 
party rode gleefully in the swing 
on the front lawn and the rest clam- 
bered upon the old stage-coach (also 



5° 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



on the lawn) and surveyed the scen- 
ery. Soon "Don" led us around 
back of the hotel ; and there, with 
the black angry waxes of the swim- 
ming pool tossing madly and the 
breakers booming in our ears, we 
consumed wonderfully welcome 
coffee and cake. 




Photograph by I. L. Lee, Jr. 

A CAMPING GROUND 



Shortly after two we continued 
on our way, which was rendered 
more dusty now by the sun that had 
broken through the clouds and was 
flooding Franconia Notch. Going 
at a more leisurely pace, w r e left 
North Woodstock and the Flume 
House behind us. Arriving at our 
camping place, a mile beyond the 
Flume House, w r e found that strang- 
ers had pitched tents there. Mr. 
Kennedy's tact, however, prevailed, 
and the campers moved down the 
road in short order. A bath in the 
icy stream nearby refreshed us, and 
our bunks, though hard and stubbly, 
were all occupied early in the eve- 
ning. 



Wednesday, August 8 

22 3-10 miles 

We awoke early on the morning 
of our heralded "big day" to find a 
strong nor'wester sending big black 
clouds across the sky. A few scat- 
tering raindrops lowered our hopes 
momentarily ; but by 8 :20 when, re- 
enforced by Nelson Curtis, '12, we 
started off, the sky was clear. 

After an hour's walk, during 
which we got a fine view r of the 
"Old Man of the Mountains"(no, 
"Woof-woof," not Mr. Crosman !) 
— we came to the ruins of the Pro- 
file House and the two dozen ad- 
jacent cottages, which had burned 
less than a week before. It was a 
scene of utter desolation. All we 
could see was a row r of brick chim- 
neys and some salvaged furniture 
reposing on the tennis courts. 

Now the work began in earnest. 
Striking up the Profile House trail, 
we commenced our ascent of Mt. 




Photograph by R. G. Sagebeer 
EAGLE LAKE 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



5* 



Lafayette. After an hour's steep 
climb we came down into a little 
hollow where lay Eagle Lake, a 
small, quiet, sheltered pool, sur- 
rounded by the towering stately 
peaks of the range. This was the 
timber-line ; for another three-quar- 
ters of an hour we scrambled over 
the rocks, and came to the summit 
just as the wind reached hurricane 
violence. There was a wonderful 
view : Washington alone reared its 
head above us, while below lay the 
Sandwich range, to the south 
loomed Chocorua's sharp peak, and 
far eastward the Green mountains 
rose hazily against the horizon. 

But all this time the mercury was 
doing its best to drop out of sight, 
and we were shivering in the icy 
blast ; so we hurriedly signed the 
register, cheered, and started down 
along the "knife edge," turning 
south for the first time during the 
walk. Then it was up again to an- 
other peak, Mt. Lincoln, much the 
same as Lafayette. After a brief 
halt we descended Little Haystack 
Mountain, and then continued on a 
lower level towards Mt. Liberty. 
Soon we left the curious scrub 
growth of the ridge top and entered 
the woods again. After a long 
tramp through a beautiful ever- 
green forest, we came face to face 
with a sign reading "A. M. C. Shel- 
ter, 1-8 mile." Ravenous, we de- 
scended this steep path. After 
stumbling desperately for what 
seemed at least half a mile (who- 



ever wrote the sign must have had 
a full stomach), we at last arrived 
at the shelter. We drank from a 
fine spring and then went inside the 
cabin and ate lunch. Everyone was 
rather winded ; so Mr. Curtis told 
an after-dinner story while we lay 
on the justly famous "balsam beds." 
Thus encouraged, we aroused our- 



selves from our lethan 



;y- 



"Don" 



told all the "pass-outs" to stay at 
the shelter while he and the rest 
climbed Liberty. Everyone started 
up the mountain except Harding, 
Lindsay, and Winpenny, and Mr. 
Robbins. 




Photograph by I. L. Lee, Jr. 

SUMMIT OF MT. LIBLRTY 

Liberty — the highest of the south- 
ern peaks of the range — was great. 
The climb, though steep, was sur- 
prisingly short. Liberty's summit 
was much warmer than the others ; 
consequently the view seemed bet- 
ter. From this peak we could make 
out Bear Mountain and our own 
lake. 

Soon we turned, retraced our 
steps, joined the left-behinds, and 
clambered down the steep slope of 
the mountain. We came out in the 
Flume, a deep ravine whose beauty 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



was greatly impaired by a board- 
walk covered with tourists. After 
posing for a photograph, we kept 
on and soon arrived at the Flume 

Mouse, where we were treated to 
sodas by Mr. Curtis. Five miles 
farther on we came to our camping 
grounds near the Alpine Hotel and 
found our tents already pitched, 
thanks to "Bunk" Esty, the popular 
driver of the pack-wagon. The day 
ended with a swim in the dam close 
by and a water-melon treat at sup- 
per. 

Thursday, August 9 9 l / 2 miles 

After eleven hours of welcome 
sleep, we arose with the sun, high 
in the sky, streaming upon us. The 
climax of the walk had been reached 
and the long tramps were over; this 
was an easy day. We entered 
North Woodstock in the middle of 
the morning, and, scattering among 
various stores, spent money lavishly. 
"Don' Murchie proved himself the 
uncontested champion eater of the 
party; while Messrs. Kennedy and 
Macomber were Valentinoed to the 
best of the village barber's ability. 
Shortly afterwards we swam in the 
(lore River and lunched on the 
bank. Mr. Kennedy's glossy hair 
was ruffled by an unfortunately- 
aimed rock, and as a result the after- 
noon's walk to I [orner's Pine 
Grove was grim and brisk. Hor- 
ner's was a beautiful camping spot, 
and the soft moss made wonderful 
beds for us. 




Photograph by I. L. Lee, Jr. 

ALL RLADY FOR A BIG BREAKFAST 



Friday, August 10 9 l / 2 miles 
After over-sleeping and walking 
half a mile for an enervating dip 
in a frog pond, we went en our way 
not feeling exceptionally "peppy." 
Having walked all morning, we 
reached Campton Hollow and 
dipped once more into the Beebe 
River. Then, with our ears filled 
with real high-class music furnished 
for us by the Dempseys, we lunched 
outside the village store. 

We ran a few miles in the after- 
noon to our camping place at Liv- 
ermore Falls. There we amused 
ourselves at the various pastimes of 
prisoner's base, dam-building, and 
hat-washing. A "long soak" in the 
benumbing brook gave us fine ap- 
petites for the huge feed of corn, 
peas, and chicken that Hob had pre- 
pared for us during the afternoon. 

Saturday, August 11 11 miles 

We awoke early, with a feeling 
of expectation. Only one more day 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



53 



remained ; and there was still one 
more high spot to be hit. There- 
fore, we couldn't help coming to the 
conclusion that the afore-mentioned 
high spot would let down its guard 
in a few hours. Breakfast held few 
charms for us — we were after big- 
ger game. A careful inspection 
about ten o'clock put fear into the 
heart of Ned Wurst ; but at the last 
moment "Don" was unexpectedly 
merciful. Ned, the one white sheep, 
accompanied the ninety-and-nine 
gray-and-blue ones to the battle. 

Soon we entered Plymouth, but 
did not falter. As we approached 
the front line trenches, we were met 
by General "Mr. Ned," and he it was 
who commanded us in the attack 
on the Pemigewasset. Chicken to 
right of us, roast beef to left of us, 



and Mr. Jackson's menu staring us 
in the face ! An hour later, all that 
was left of us staggered out of the 
valley of Refreshment. 

Nick Carter was left in the lurch 
on the way home, giving place to 
the learning of the Long Walk song. 
We walked unhurriedly in little 
groups, trying to learn Robbie's in- 
genious verses. Four miles from 
home we hit up the pace ; and by 
a tremendous sprint at the finish, 
broke the tape in record figures, 
landing at the boathouse just forty- 
five minutes after we had struck 
the main road. Thus ended the 
Long Walk of 1923, without doubt 
the finest and most successful in 
our history. 

T. H. Eliot, 
Donald Murchie. 





fi^lv 


*>•* ' jfc ■ J 


i*i 


' : K' ! ^;<- ;:'•'''-;■"'*'; ;5?**Bf^ '; 

H 


H 1 1 




? T "- • ,. ...A 

\\,<. ... * 


«•* ** ' Jj^* - **™ 


^^ 


."^wIIHHHBm 



Photograph by L. 5. Wilson 

"THL ATTACK ON THL PLMIGLWA55LT! " 



54 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



THE CARDIGAN WALK 



The Cardigan Walk, instituted by 
Chauncey Buell two years ago and 
repeated by "Jack" Bankson last 
year, has now really become a per- 
manent and very enjoyable part of 
the Pasquaney schedule. This year 
our party consisted of "Gus" Bank- 
son, "Teddy" Church, "Roscoe" Fit- 
ter, "Dick" Follis, "Eddie" Hawes, 
"Sonny" Hollister, John Howland, 
"Pete" Lillard, "Johnny" Lindsay, 
Junior McCarthy, "Gib" Mcllvain, 
"Buzz" Newlin, John Rakestraw 
and "Joe" Vetterlein, with Mr. 
Crosman and the "Doc" as guides. 
By good fortune Mr. Jackson and 
his dog "Sandy" joined at the last 
moment, thus making eighteen in 

all. 

Instead of the previous one-night 
stay at the old Welton farmhouse, 
we planned for two nights under 
the stars. In the early afternoon of 
Wednesday, August 8, we crossed 
the lake in the "Rec" and hiked over 
the old familiar post road to Wel- 
ton Falls. It was late and cold 
when we arrived, and no one braved 
the icy waters of the pool that night ; 
but after a hearty supper all tum- 
bled into the blankets. Thursday 
dawned brilliantly clear and sunny. 
When all hands had been fully 
awakened by 5 a. m., we enjoyed a 
bully breakfast and were off for 
Cardigan at 9:00. We climbed by 



the old Ackerman trail and reached 
the bare, rocky, wind-swept summit 
just at noon. Such a view as Car- 
digan affords on a clear day of the 
nearer New Hampshire hills, the 
lakes, and the ranges of peaks be- 
yond sends a thrill through even 
the most prosaic soul. It is a real 
experience. The descent by way 
of the steep rocky shoulders of Fire- 
screw kept us all hopping, particu- 
larly "Sandy" and his master, who 
had to make several detours around 
the deep ravines. It was a tired 
bunch that trudged into camp ; but 
a dip in the Falls braced up the 
spirits and appetites, and the flap- 
jacks and cocoa surely did disap- 
pear! Poor "Sandy," however, was 
all done up. He crawled into bed, 
and even his special nurse could not 
induce him to raise his head for 
food. 

After another sleep in the open 
and another dip and excellent break- 
fast the next morning, we shoul- 
dered our packs and hiked back to 
the lake. Here the launch ferried 
us home in time for dinner. Ideal 
weather, good food, and the fine 
spirit and camaraderie of the bunch 
combined to make the Cardigan 
W r alk a thoroughly enjoyable ex- 
perience. 

L. T. Davidson. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



55 



THE CHRONICLE OF THE STAY-AT-HOMES 



At nine o'clock sharp on Monday 
morning, August 6th, the Long 
Walk party, a select twenty-seven, 
set out on their trip to Lafayette 
and the Flume, amidst cheers from 
the rest of us campers, concerning 
whose doings I am now about to 
relate. 

In the afternoon of Monday there 
was a Junior League baseball game 
between the quaintly-named "Oat- 
meals" and "Shredded Wheats." 
The latter won by a count of 11-3. 
The other Stay-at-Homes amused 
themselves with tennis and such 
major sports as ping-pong, cat, 
quoits, etc. Around the blazing 
campfire (one of Frank Reed's mas- 
terpieces tout a la Boy Scout) Wal- 
lace Ritchie entertained us with 
reading. 

All the small boys who were ex- 
pectantly hoping to go out on camp- 
ing parties the following morning 
awoke to find the weather rainy. 
Consequently they had to defer 
their hopes and content themselves 
with boxing and wrestling and a 
general Round Robin ping-pong 
tournament which was won eventu- 
ally by "Jack" Clarke. In the af- 
ternoon, which again was clear, the 
"Post Toasties" met the "Corn 
Flakes" and defeated them, 16-10. 
Mr. Spaeth furnished amusement at 



campfire by reading a story about 
"Good Old Siwash." 

Wednesday dawned cloudy and 
unsettled, and again the smaller fry 
were disappointed in their camping 
party aspirations. The walkers 
headed for Mount Cardigan, how- 
ever, having already been delayed 
one day, were able to leave after 
lunch, being guided and directed by 
Mr. Crosman, Mr. Jackson, and the 
Doctor. The "Shredded Wheats" 
again came out victorious in an ex- 
citing game with the "Post Toast- 
ies," the final score being 14-13. 

At last, on Thursday morning, the 
long-prayed-for good weather ar- 
rived, and the dauntless little camp- 
ers ventured forth, in three parties, 
under the guiding care of Messrs. 
Spaeth, Bradley, Hinchman, and 
Lodge. In camp during the after- 
noon there was a general, free-for- 
all baseball game, and at campfire 
"Jack" Thompson kept everyone 
awake a while longer with Edgar 
Allen Poe. 

Nothing much happened on Fri- 
day until just before lunch, when 
the Cardigan walkers returned, foot- 
sore and generally tired. All had 
enjoyed a good time, but Mr. Jack- 
son and "Sandy" owned up to a feel- 
ing of stiffness in the joints. That 
afternoon two war canoe parties 



56 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 

cruised to Sanborn's Beach and martial tones of "Yankee Doodle" 
there disported themselves pleas- floating up the hillside, and a few 
antly. seconds later the Walkers appeared. 
During soak on Saturday morn- marching in close order and whis- 
ing the camping parties appeared, tling as they came. lust below 
and then all thoughts were directed Memorial they halted, cheered Mr. 
towards the return of the Long Ned, attempted to sing their Long- 
Walkers. Nothing hut tennis oc- Walk song, and then, hungry-eyed. 
CUpied the Stay-at-Homes until swarmed into the dining room. 
about five in the afternoon, when the Grace was said ; and now let us leave 
Long Walkers' duffle hags arrived the Stay-at-Home history in the 
and were promptly unpacked. Just soup. 

before the second bugle for supper R. B. Gowing. 

the expectant listeners heard the 



THE LONG WALK CAMPING PARTIES 
(August 9th- 11th) 



After having been delayed for two ing, and eating and sleeping were 

days by rainy weather, the Long the chief diversions everywhere. 

Walk camping parties, manned The parties had just about settled 

chiefly by the youngest Pasquaney- down to genuine enjoyment of their 

ites of the 1923 brood, finally set lot when the arrival of Saturday 

out on Thursday, August 9th, to morning forced them to return to 

spend two days of relaxation at Camp. It is an almost unparalleled 

Mayhew's, Hornet's, and Cliff. The fact that there occurred no mishap 

quantity of food that accompanied — no ankle cracked, no rmger sev- 

the parties was unprecedented, but ered — that required even the open- 

this seemed to have no prohibitive ing of the medical kits, 

effect at all on the juvenile stom- The following summaries will 

achs of the expeditionary forces. give the reader a little enlighten- 

The weather during the two days ment about the personnel of the 

was as if made to order. Soaking. three parties: 
cruising, baseballing, nigger-baby- 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



57 




Photograph by T. H. Hinchman, Jr. 

A KIDDIL5' CAMPING PARTY 

CAMP LOAFAWAY 



Win- 



The Locality : Hornets Cove. 

The Disturbers : Mr. "U d o" 
Bradley and "Jim" Henning. 

The Loafers: "Bobby" Biddle, 
"Bobby" Buell, "Dick" Bulkeley, 
"BilT' Fuller, "Fen" Keyser, "Bob- 
by" Nields, George Payson, 
ny" Sargent. 

What they got for loafing 
Best Camper 
Most Helpful 
Most Cheerful 

Cow B 

Water Rat also Bulkele> 



The final elections : 
Best Camper 
Most Helpful 
Sea Horse 
Pretty Boy 
Cow 



Ames 

Sanford 

Owen 

Cann 

likewise Barry 



CAMP TIPPYCANOE 



The Scene : Cliff Island. 

The Tippers : Messrs. John 
Spaeth and John Lodge. 

The Tipped : "California" An- 
thony, "Eddie" Brainard, "Hank" 
Burrall, "Weeny Willie" Carleton, 
"Dicky" Dana, "Dyna" Hufnagel, 
"Smilin' Kenny" Ogden, "Newtie" 
Shaffer, "Irv" Taylor. 

The Penalties inflicted : 





Best Camper 


Burrall 




Most Helpfullest 


Ogden 


Buell 


Most Cheerful 


Ogden again 


Fuller 


Camp Beauty 


Shaffer 


Buell 


Water Turtle 


Hufnagel 


lkeley 







CAMP BUZZINKTWIGGER 



The site: Mayhew's Island. 

The big Buzzinks : Sir Harry 
Hinchman and "Junior" Owen (both 
of Detroit). 

The young Buzzinks : "Jimmy" 
Ames, Dick Blabon, Barry Cann, 
"Sammy" Colgate, "Timmy" Day, 
"Buelly" Hollister, "Jim" Sanford, 
"Charlie" Sargent. 



1 






. 


4 




f ... 
§ 














"J\ 


€ w 


5 



Photograph by T. H. Hinchman, Jr. 

HAVING FUN ON THE BLACH 
A KIDDIL5' PARTY 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 




Sketch by J. C. Thompson 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



59 



THE CIRCUS 



"Step right this way, gentlemen ; 
step right this way ! See the four- 
legged Princess Ptomania, the only 
living person who can walk with 
two feet off the ground. Visit the 
Tunnel of Mystery, by all means ! 
Guaranteed to turn the hair green 
and make the blood r-r-run co-o-old. 
Gaze upon the Blubbering Boravian 
Blobs, the wildest creatures ever 
known to man, imported with great 
difficulty and at great expense from 
the darkest corners of Boravia ! 
See how they look on the posters ; 
that's the way they look inside ! 
Don't crowd, please ; don't crowd. 
Plenty of room for all !" 

Truly these words must be the 
wierdest ever heard on the virgin 
slopes of Plymouth Mountain on a 
bright, sunny August afternoon. 
Their meaning, of course, was ob- 
vious — the circus was coming to 
Camp : Tingling Brothers' masto- 
donic three-ring circus, the greatest 
spectacle ever conceived by the 
mind of man, the most startling, 
mystifying, soul-stirring conglom- 
eration of Fact and Fancy ever pre- 
sented to the public ! 

Picture, if you can, those of you 
who have seen Pasquaney, or who 
are old Pasquaney boys, — try to 
picture, I say, the porches of Birch 
and Dana shrouded in blankets, 
converted into countless booths 
hiding: such wonders as the "Man 




Photograph by F. O. Reed 

"THE PEERLESS FORTUNE-TELLER" 
AND MR. WOO CHOW 

with the Wizened Legs," "Princess 
Melachrino, the Peerless Fortune- 
Teller, " the wild animals ("Genus: 
Blob ; Habitat : Boravia"), and other 
wonders too numerous to mention. 
Think of the Playhouse, changed in- 
to a miniature three-ring circus in 
itself, with hourly exhibitions of 
the "Bearded Lady," the "Pygmy," 
the "Fat Lady," and the insidious 
"Snake Charmer" of the Orient. 
Imagine the headquarters, closely 
veiled with tents and blankets, en- 
ticing innocent curiosity-seekers 



6o 



THE PASOUAXEY ANNUAL 



into a series of thrills and surprises 
guaranteed to break the spirit of 
the stoutest soul. Add to all these 
a Fan-Tan tent, a tight-rope walker, 
an African Dodger, and a merry-go- 
round, and you will have some 
slight idea of the general appear- 
ance of the Camp on circus day. 
Then, I beseech you, conjure up in 
your mind the picture of your old 
friend, "Teddy" Jackson, attired in 
an outlandish rig, consisting of a 
megaphone hat, bushy black beard, 
a pair of leather riding boots, and 
a corselet of encircling tennis tapes; 
imagine "Jack" Thompson, clothed 
in a frock coat, felt hat, and rubber 
boots, tearing all over Camp, red- 
faced and perspiring, endeavoring 
to imitate the inimitable Mr. Moody 
as Cam]) photographer ; add to all 
this six shots from the cannon, fif- 
teen wildly enthusiastic clowns, and 
half a dozen raw-voiced barkers, 
and you will have some idea of the 
circus of nineteen twenty-three. 

In my humble opinion, the circus 
should most certainly become a 
regular event of the season. It 
does as much as, if not more than 




Photograph by R. C. Berresford 

"WILDLY ENTHUSIASTIC CLOWNS' 



anything else in the summer, to 
bring out the originality and initia- 
tive in the boys, and gets them pull- 
ing in the manner so characteristic 
of all things at Pasquaney. 

David K. Grant. 




THE VILW FROM THL "HAUNTLD HOUSL' 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



61 



ATHLETICS 



ROWING 



Junior 



The 1923 rowing season began on 
the first day of Camp, when twenty- 
five boys were put on the water, 
either in the shells or the pair-oar. 
The material at hand included only 
two boys who had rowed in Senior 
Crews ; but the cloud had its silver 
lining, for there were in Camp seven 
members of the fast Junior Crews 
of the preceding year, several of 
whom became very able oars. The 
work progressed as rapidly as such 
activities as Baseball and the Walks 
would allow ; and by the time the 
camping parties had returned five 
fours were boated, from which the 
Exhibition Crews were to be picked. 
Only one experienced coxwain was 
light enough to be used, but no 
trouble was experienced in turning 
out a very able group of steersmen. 

Early in Water Sports week Jun- 
ior and Senior Exhibition Crews 
were picked, containing the smooth- 
est rather than the most powerful 
oarsmen on the squad. These com- 
binations were arranged as follows : 

Senior 

Eliot Stroke 

Hinchman, D. 3 

Murchie, D. 2 

Miller Bow 

Rakestraw, E. Coxwain 



Harding, F. 
Brewster 
Ritchie, E. 
Berresford 
Stanwood 



Stroke 

3 

2 

Bow 

Coxwain 



These boats contained three oars- 
men (Miller, Ritchie, and Berres- 
ford) who had never rowed on a 
crew, and both coxwains were with- 
out previous experience ; but their 
rapid development earned them 
places ahead of more experienced 
rivals. Both crews performed cred- 
itably on Water Sports day. 

After the Long Walk, crew work 
began in earnest, with the serious 
goal, the races, but two weeks ahead. 
The Seniors were built up behind 
Eliot and Donald Murchie as 
strokes, the former an experienced 
schoolboy pacemaker, the latter less 
experienced but quick to learn and 
well adapted to the position because 
of his leadership and speed with his 
hands. Berresford was selected for 
one Junior stroke because his four 
years as a coxwain, two of which 
were as captain, had made him a 
natural leader and a heady stroke. 
Miller was finally picked to set the 
beat for the other Junior boat, and 
he amply justified his selection by 
his coolness under fire on the day 
of the races. Behind these boys, 
crews were finally boated which 



62 



THE PASOUANEV ANNUAL 



proved very even in the final time- 
trials. 

Race Day dawned calm and clear, 
but a wind blew up during the 

afternoon and raised a very heavy 
sea by the time the Juniors left the 
float, delayed for an hour by the tar- 
diness of the "Stella." The Juniors 
went to the line seated as follows: 

Dana 

Miller (Capt.) Stroke 



Gowing, C. 
Lillard 

Vetterlein 
Hawes 



3 

2 

Bow 

Coxwain 



Birch 

Berresford (Capt.) Stroke 
Howland 3 

Curtis 2 

Lindsay, C. Bow 

Winstead Coxwain 

Dana, on the inside course, got 
hold of the water more firmly, and 
went away to a quarter-length lead 
on the racing start. As the crews 
settled into their racing strokes, 
Miller at thirty and Berresford at 
twenty-eight, the greater power be- 
hind the former began to tell, and 
the Dana boat gradually increased 
the lead to a few feet of open water 
at Fogg's, where Berresford raised 
the count to thirty, and began to 
lap the Dana rudder. Here Miller 
answered his rival's challenge, and 
again drew away. Both strokes 
went to thirty-three in their final 
spurts, and were well followed by 
their crews. Miller's shell crossed 



King 
Harding, F. 



the line a length and a half ahead in 
the good time of 3 min., 13 sec. 

When the Seniors took the water 
the wind had stirred up a nasty sea. 
but it failed to cool the ardor of the 
crews as they paddled to the start- 
ing line, wrapped in heavy sweaters. 
These crews were as follows : 

Dana 

Murchie, D. (Capt.) Stroke 

3 
2 

Brewster Bow 

Rakestraw, E. Coxwain 

Birch 

Eliot (Capt.) Stroke 

Murchie, G. 3 

Ritchie, E. 2 

Hinchman, D. Bow 

Stanwood Coxwain 

After some difficulty, due to the 
wind, the Seniors were sent away. 
Dana got a beautiful start and led 
by a half length at the end of the 
first twenty strokes. Murchie set 
the boat at thirty, while Eliot was 
content to hang onto his opponent's 
rudder with a twenty-eight. The 
better run between strokes and the 
faster work with the hands in the 
Dana boat told, and Birch slowly 
dropped behind. After the half- 
mile point was passed, open water 
began to show. Eliot refused to 
raise the beat, though at one point 
he regained a few feet by leg drives ; 
Murchie, still rowing a driving 
thirty, had open water at Fogg's. 
Here Eliot hit it up to thirty-two. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



63 



but there was plenty of reserve in 
the Dana crew, and the count was 
increased to a smart thirty-three. 
Swinging beautifully together in 
their final effort, Dana crossed the 
line with three-quarters of a length 
of open water, in the time of 4 min., 
27 3-5 sec, which was very good 
considering the conditions. 

The rowing season was character- 
ized by the usual fine spirit which 
we are accustomed to see here at 
Camp. In picking the recipient of 
the Yale Cup the coaches selected 
Donald Murchie, because of his sin- 
cere interest in the sport, his help- 
fulness at all times, and his fine 
leadership which showed its results 
in the fire and dash with which his 
crew rowed, both in practice and in 
the race. Mention should also be 
made of the boy to whom the Cup 
was awarded last year. Richard 
Berresford showed the same fine 
qualities of sportsmanship which 
have characterized his work through 
five Pasquaney rowing seasons. 
U. T. Bradley. 



SWIMMING 



The most thoroughly enjoyed ac- 
tivities of the Camp season are 
those in and on the water. Boys 
easily acquire skill in sports that 
delight them. It seldom appears to 



be a problem to teach the boys how 
to swim, nearly all being so keen 
about the water that restraint 
usually is more necessary than en- 
couragement. 

Decided and successful efforts 
are made throughout the nine weeks 
to bring as many as possible to a 
point of efficiency, on and in the 
water, which will enable each one 
to meet any and all unforeseen hap- 
penings with ability and equanim- 
ity. In addition to practice in hand- 
ling boats and canoes in all circum- 
stances, instruction is given in the 
methods of helping others in the 
water and in the methods of resusci- 
tation. 

To use a boat a boy must be able 
to swim at least one hundred yards ; 
only those who have swum their 
"half-miles" are given permission to 
use canoes. When one considers 
the large number of young boys in 
Camp, the fact that practically sixty 
of the ninety-five have swum this 
half-mile distance seems a record to 
be proud of. This, together with 
the facts that every boy in Camp 
can swim, that among the older 
boys there has been an unusually 
keen interest in developing speed 
and perfection in the water, that 
the time record for the half-mile has 
been lowered to 13:08 by John 
Howland, points towards a decided 
progress in these lines of activity. 
J. M. Crosman. 



6 4 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



TENNIS 



This summer will long be remem- 
bered in Xew Hampshire as one ex- 
tremely arid, and so the tennis 
courts became so very dry that it 
was just one long battle with the 
hose to kee{% them from blowing 
away altogether. 

But if the courts were dry, it was 
not so with the tennis season as a 
whole. Interest in the sport was 
so rampant that it made us realize 
by next year we would have to build 
another court to accommodate all 
those who wanted to play. The 
courts were in use, as the saying 
goes, "morning, afternoon and 
night." This is a fact, for many 
times, boys missed half of their sup- 
per in order to stay on the courts 
and only then did they reluctantly 
stop playing because they were sent 
for by the C. O. D. 

This year, as last, we had many 
practice tournaments and we tried 
the innovation of having handicap 
tournaments. These latter proved 
very successful as it gave the poorer 
players a chance to improve their 
skill by playing with those who 
were more adept, and it taught the 
better players to take good care not 
to beat themselves! It is our boast 
that by the end of the season, every 
boy in Camp knew how to play ten- 
nis. Some better than others, but 
then we must all needs make a be- 
ginning sometime. Many boys 
were greatly helped by the instruc- 
tion gfiveii in the three fundamental 




Photograph by T. H. Hinchman, Jr. 

FINALS, SUB-JUNIOR DOUBLES 



strokes, — namely, the forehand, the 
backhand and the service. 

As a culmination to the tennis 
season came the Championship 
Tournaments. 

The Sub-Junior Doubles finals 
were played off on Saturday, August 
25th, amidst the applause of a gal- 
lery which saw "Bobby" Buell and 
"Jimmy" Ames outmaneuver their 
opponents, Barry Cann and "Tony" 
Munson in this Lilliputian battle by 
a score 6-11, 6-4. 

There is no doubt that, consider- 
ing the age of the contestants, a bet- 
ter match has never been played at 
Pasquaney than the finals of the 
Sub-Junior Singles, when "Charlie" 
Sargent, by sheer aggressiveness. 
defeated "Jimmy" Ames 8-6, 1-6, 
6-4. 

The Junior Doubles were rather 
easily won by "Gus" Bankson and 
"Billy" Winstead, wh<> in the finals 
defeated "Sonny" Hollister and 
Sheldon Roots 6-1, 6-1. 

The Junior Singles afforded much 
interest to the spectators on Satur- 
day afternoon. John Lindsay was 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



65 



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Photograph by ? 



WINNERS (right) AND RUNNE.RS-UP (left) IN 
SUB-JUNIOR DOUBLES 



pitted against "Charlie" Stanwood, 
the former by the greater command 
of his shots, winning 6-3, 6-3. 

Unfortunately, due to the uncer- 
tainty of the weather conditions the 
finals of the Senior Doubles had to 
be played on the morning of Satur- 
day thus depriving many of the op- 
portunity of witnessing a mighty 
exciting and close match. This 
match proved again how neces- 
sary it is for the members of a 
doubles team to play together 
continually and how it is only 
through constant practice, as a 
team, thus one partner, will come 
to instinctively know just what his 
team-mate will do at any particular 
moment. Due, in large part to 
their long practice as a team, "Pete" 
Lillard and "Bobby" Gray were just 
able to win from Ivy Lee and "Ed- 
die" Rakestraw 6-4, 10-8. 



The finals of the Senior Singles 
tournament proved to be a match 
filled with surprises from beginning 
to end. In the first set "Jack" 
Hinchman was leading Ivy Lee 5-4 
and the score in the tenth game was 
30-30. However, Ivy took the next 
two points, making the score 5-5. 
Then, not allowing Jack again to 
take the lead in this set, he at length 
won at 8-6. The second set was 
comparatively easy going for Jack, 
who won it 6-3. In the third set 
the tables were again reversed and 
Ivy easily won it, allowing his op- 
ponent only two games. In the 
fourth set although Ivy was leading 
4-2, Jack won four successive games 
and the set 6-4, thereby evening up 
the score, since each player had now 
won two sets. The final set was 
one which made all the spectators 



66 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



hold their breath in tense excite- 
ment, so unusual and thrilling was 
the exhibition they beheld! The 
first four games were easily won by 
lack, then [vy managed to win one 
and then Jack another. This made 
it 5-1, fack leading. The seventh 



BASEBALL 




Photograph by ? 

JOHN LIND5AY WINS JUNIOR SINGLES 

game was a long" deuce affair in 
which Jack had his opponent match 
point hut which Ivy finally won. 
Lee wins another deuce game and 
then a love one, making the score 
5-4. Jack still leading. Although 
Jack was serving and had Ivy 30-l5 
the latter won this game and the 
two following, giving him the match 
and with it the Senior Singles 
Championship for 1923. Score: — 
[vy Lee defeated John Ilinchman 
8-6, 3-6, 6-2, 4-6, 7-5. 

D. D. Kennedv. 



At Pasquaney every effort is made 
to interest as large a number of 
boys as possible in baseball. The 
idea is not only to give them health- 
ful exercise and pleasure but also 
to teach them the ideals of fair play 
and good sportsmanship for which 
Pasquaney stands. It is our pur- 
pose furthermore to increase the 
knowledge of those boys who al- 
ready find keen enjoyment in this 
sport and to teach those who are 
not so familiar with the game, how 
to play. 

The 1923 season opened about 
two days after Camp began with a 
game for the new boys. Shortly 
after this game the Counsellor's 
League was organized. The league 
consisted of four teams, composed 
of older boys and counsellors and 
captained by "Pete" Lillard (Team 
A), "Dave" Hinchman (Team B), 
"Bolt" Winpenny (Team C), and 
"Bob" Gray (Team D). 

In the first two weeks of Camp 
many scrub games were played but 
no League contests, owing to the 
fact that the camping parties were 
out. In the third week, however, 
the League season opened. Since 
the four teams were fairly evenly 
matched some interesting and ex- 
citing games were played. Team 
C, captained by Winpenny, finally 
emerged victorious. The last game 
was played between Teams A and 
C ; it was a seven inning game and 
was very closely contested. At the 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



67 



beginning of the sixth inning the 
score was 4-4. Team C was in the 
field and held A to no runs. When 
C came to bat, the first two batters 
struck out. The next batter, Win- 
penny, knocked out a single. Lee 
then followed him at bat and 
brought in two runs by knock- 
ing out a homer. "Tom" Eliot, 
continuing his good pitching, 
again held A to no hits in the 
first half of the seventh, and so 
the game was won by C by the 
score of 6-4. The winning team 
lined up as follows: Eliot p., Mr. 
Ritchie c, Mr. Macomber 1 b., E. 
Rakestraw 2 b., Winpenny (Capt.) 
s.s., Lee 3 b., Stanwood l.f., F. 
Harding c.f., and Beebe r.f. Sub- 
stitutes: Winstead, D. Codman, 
and Mr. E. Codman. The final 
standing of the teams was : 

Won Lost Pet. 
Team C 3 1.000 

Teams A, B, and D 1 2 .333 




Photograph by T. H. Hinchman, Jr. 

TWO MLMBLR5 OF THE, "CE.REAL 
LE.AGUL" 



Immediately following the close 
of the Counsellor's League season, 



a Junior League was organized. It 
was called the "Cereal League" and 
was composed of four teams, — The 
Oatmeals, The Shredded Wheats, 
The Corn Flakes, and the Post 
Toasties, captained respectively by 
"Bobby" Biddle, "Ken" Ogden, 
"Jim" Ames, and "Bill" Fuller. 
Some of the Cereal League games 
were played during the Long Walk 
week, and the remainder in the next 
two weeks. The Shredded Wheats 
won the championship by easily de- 
feating the Corn Flakes in a loosely 
played game, 17-0. The final stand- 
ing of the teams was : 

Won Lost Pet. 
Shredded Wheats 3 1.000 

Oatmeals 2 1 .667 

Post Toasties 1 2 .333 

Corn Flakes 3 .000 

The game of The Boys vs. The 
Counsellors marked the close of the 
1923 baseball season. The Boys, 
with an exceptionally fine team, de- 
feated The Counsellors in a closely 
contested game, 11-10. 

Throughout the entire season 
there were many scrub games, not 
only for all boys but also some 
special games for those small boys 
who were not on any team. All 
showed a fine spirit of interest and 
enthusiasm, and turned out whole- 
heartedly for all the games. 

In determining the award of the 
Harvard Cup for "general excel- 
lence in baseball at Camp Pas- 
quaney" and also for helpfulness 
and co-operation with the coaches, 



68 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



there were four boys who were given 
serious consideration. Bolton Win- 
penny, however, stood out above 
the rest, not only in general excel- 
lence in baseball but also in his 
helpfulness in organizing games, 



and accordingly was awarded the 
cup. Special honorable mention, 
however, should be made of "Rod ' 
Beebe, Percy Owen, and "Charlie"' 
Stanwood. 

W. B. Macomber. 



THE NATURALIST'S REPORT 



The first activity in the Nature 
line this summer was the resump- 
tion of the early-morning Bird 
Walks. The enthusiasm for these 
displayed itself in applications from 
thirty-eight boys who wished to be 
awakened before Reveille. Each of 
these was taken out at least once, 
and many were on three or four 
walks before the Water Sports and 
the Long Walk interfered. 

Meanwhile, expeditions of a some- 
what different nature were conduct- 
ed up the Cockermouth River, and 
the most interesting result of these 
trips was the discovery and obser- 
vation of three baby Green Herons 
just hatched. They and the parents 
were frequently seen ; and about 
two weeks after the babies had been 
hatched a war canoe party saw the 
last of the three scramble away 
from the nest for the last time, into 
the bushes. 

This discovery, together with dis- 
coveries of a Vireo's nest, a Cedar 
Waxwing's nest, two Phoebe's nests, 
and numerous Robins' nests, fur- 
nished interest in the Original Re- 
search contest. The medal in this 



department was awarded to "Fer- 
die" Hufnagel for his observations 
and reading. 

Other trips were taken in search 
of leaves, since the collection this 
year was used to direct and stimu- 
late the closer study of trees. The 
medal for this work was won by 
Whitney Hoyt, with honorable 
mention for "Billy" Carleton. 

The Essay Contest probably dis- 
closed the greatest variety. One 
very interesting essay, with con- 
structive purpose, was presented by 
"Bob" Gowing. He suggested rea- 
sons for a freshened interest in insect 
collections, which would be attend- 
ed with profit another year. This 
contest was won, how-ever, by Basil 
Henning's essay relating a very in- 
teresting occurrence of the Long- 
Walk. The novelty and setting of 
this incident, together with its sim- 
ple and charmingly straight-forward 
narration, combine to make of the 
essay a very interesting contribution 
to this "Annual." 

R. G. Sagebeer. 

Naturalist. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



69 



THE PRIZE ESSAY 



AN INCIDENT ON THE LONG 
WALK 



It was a moonlight mght on the 
Long Walk of 1923. Two counsel- 
lors sat by the fire sipping their 
coffee. There came a slight rat- 
tling in the bushes. "A porcupine," 
said one. Rising, they flung some 
stones at it and chased it into the 
woods. Returning to their com- 
fortable positions at the fire, they 
decided to wait for the porcupine to 
return. 

Then, to the west of their camp, 
they heard a muffled bark which, as 
near as I can imitate it on paper, 
was like this : "Hu-hu-hu-hu-hu." 
It was the signal call of the male 
fox. Then to the east of the fire, 



from the slope of Mt. Liberty, there 
came an answering call in a higher 
pitch: "Hu-hu-hu-hu-hu." It was 
the answer of the female. 

Gradually the deep tones of the 
male showed that he was circling 
around the camp. At intervals he 
would bark, sometimes changing 
the rhythm, but always it seemed 
as if he were signalling to his mate 
upon the hill. Finally the two foxes 
seemed to be together and then the 
male changed his bark. It was no 
longer a signal, rather it seemed to 
be a challenge, as if he were defy- 
ing anyone to take his mate. 

For a while the men could hear 
the two animals as they went off 
together. But soon the silence of 
the woods closed down, thus ending 
this interesting incident of the wild. 
Basil D. Henning. 




HOW WOULD YOU LIKE, THIS KIND OF THING TODAY? 



yo 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 




THE SIGMA ALPHA FRATERNITY 
1923 



Philip Van Dyke Beckwith 
Richard Case Berresford 
Udolpho Theodore Bradley 
George Wales Brewster 
Daniel Sargent Codman 
Eliot Codman 
|ohn Marshall Crosman 
Leonard Tomb Davidson 
Thomas Hopkinson Eliot 
Charles Chauncey Goodrich 
Charles Darrow Gowing 
Robert Bigelow Gowing 
David Kimball Grant 
Robert ( iray 

James Williamson Henning, 3rd 
David Ballentine Hinchman 
fohn Marshall Hinchman, 2nd 
Theodore Henry Hinchman, Jr. 
Edward William Cecil Jackson 



Donald Davidson Kennedy 
Herbert Thorn King, Jr. 
Walter Huston Lillard, Jr. 
William Bernard Macomber 
Huntington Miller 
Donald Murchie 
Percy Owen, Jr. 
Edward Hyde Rakestraw 
John Louis Rakestraw 
Frank Otheman Reed 
Edwin Winter Ritchie 
Wallace Parks Ritchie 
Richard Grafflin Sagebeer 
William Stackhouse Scull, 2nd 
John William Spaeth, Jr. 
John Cranwill Thompson 
Austin Treadwell White, Jr. 
Edward Simpson Wilson 
James Bolton Winpenny, 2nd 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



7i 




THE WHITE PINE SOCIETY 
1923 



James Barr Ames 
Earle Kelly Anthony 
Lloyd Bankson, 2nd 
Roderick Beebe, Jr. 
Robert Catlin Buell, Jr. 
Henry Driggs Burrall 
Franklin Pattison Cator, Jr. 
Edgar Moore Church, Jr. 
Samuel Eliot Codman 
Samuel Colgate 
John Norman Curtis 
Willis Scull De La Cour 
Richard Dana de Rham 
Ralston Biddle Fitler 
Joseph Warner Fobes 
Richard Holden Follis, Jr. 
William Whitehead Fuller, 2nd 
Francis Appleton Harding 
John Briard Harding 
William McCord Harris, Jr. 
David Steele Hart 
Edmund Thatcher Hawes 
Basil Duke Henning 
Henry Crane Hollister 
John Howland, Jr. 



Whitney Ford Hoyt 
Frederick Bernard Hufnagel, Jr. 
Floyd Wellman Jefferson, Jr. 
Thomas Louis Jefferson, 3rd 
Ivy Ledbetter Lee, Jr. 
Frederick Norton Leonard 
Ellwood Caldwell Lindsay, Jr. 
John Franciscus Lindsay 
Carrington Mason Lloyd 
Townsend Munson 
Guy Murchie, Jr. 
Howell Kenton Newlin 
Kenneth Charles Ogden, Jr. 
Sheldon Roots 
Leonard Jacob Sanford 
Theodore Carmalt Scull 
Newton Melman Shaffer, 3rd 
Charles Fuller Stanwood 
Wirt Lord Thompson, Jr. 
William Kneeland Townsend 
Laurence Edward Tracy 
Joseph Roy Vetterlein, Jr. 
William Henry Winstead, Jr. 
Perry Edward Wurst, Jr. 



72 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 





SOML MORE. SNAP SHOTS! 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



73 



THE LOG 
1923 



June 27 — As Mr. Ned cordially wel- 
comed us after our arrival from 
the Pemigewasset, the 29th 
season began, marked shortly 
after by the symbolical can- 
non salute, and the breaking of 
the flags. Owen Lindsay, 
'21, accompanied us for a visit. 
28 — Baseball, rowing, ping-pong, 
and a hare-and-hounds chase 
started camp activities with a 
vim. Due to a late rain, Re- 
treat was omitted. 



J"w£--2<? 




29 — In the morning rain made 
necessary the indoor sport of 
ping-pong, but in the after- 
noon fair weather permitted a 
wider choice. Mr. Ned urged 
solemnity at Retreat, but 
"Jack" Thompson bugled! 

30 — The annual "Barnyard" Estate 
walk in the afternoon ren- 
dered all just tired enough to 
enjoy Kelly Anthony's show, 
as well as two other playlets 



and the usual moving pictures, 
at the Playhouse after Retreat. 
July 1 — In the chapel Mr. Ned 
preached stirringly on "Oppor- 
tunity." Mr. Kennedy deliv- 
ered the first Tree Talk on 
"Habit." After supper the 
first meeting of the Camp 
Society was held and "Dick" 
Berresford was elected Presi- 
dent, "Pete" Lillard, vice- 
president, "Dave" Hinchman, 
secretary-treasurer, and "Don" 
Murchie, Grand Bouncer. 

2 — Through an odd play of 
chance the weather allowed 
the first camping parties to go 
out. "Stay-at Home" tennis 
and dramatics were organized. 

3 — At home the "chain gang" 
held its first entertainment 
and was found to be as fascin- 
ating as of yore! The Water 
Sports Play rehearsals were 
commenced. 

4 — The cannon boomed forth the 
announcement of the Fourth! 
Tennis, baseball, crew, and 
dramatics filled the day. 

5 — Crew King's might shattered 
iron outrigger! The after- 
noon was sporty as usual. At 
campfire, "Many Cargoes" was 
read. 

6 — Camping parties returned and 
found "Jack" Hinchman cham- 
pion of the Stay-at-Home 
Seniors, Louis Jefferson of the 
Juniors, and "Charlie" Sar- 
gent of the Suib-juniors, in 
tennis. Trips to Archie's, Mr. 
Robbins' new songs, and the 



74 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



arrival of the late Mr. P. Owen, 
Jr., furnished further excite- 
ment. 




Joey- 7 



7 — Clement weather and Clem- 
ent's Hill made an ideal com- 
bination. After the walkers 
and others had supped, the 
great minstrel show, 1923 
model, was presented in the 
Playhouse. Owen Lindsay, 
'21, departed. 

8 — Mr. Ned's fine sermon dealt 
with "Thoughtfulness." After- 
noon council meeting was late 
in ibreaking up. At campfire 
in Baird Mr. Spaeth gave a 
Tree Talk on "Fair Play." 

9 — As soon as the second-week 
cantping parties had departed, 
Stay-at-Home tennis and dra- 
matics got under way. At 
campfire "Dick" Blabon was 
responsible for a marshmallow 
treat. 
10 — Usual Stay-at-Home activities 
were in full swing. "Jack" 
Monroe, '20, arrived to visit. 
11 — Nelson Curtis, '12, had lunch 
with us. In the afternoon 
Messrs. Macomber and Rob- 
bins conducted parties to San- 
born's Beach. The Doctor 
raised his voice at campfire. 



12 — Mr. Kennedy gave tennis in- 
struction in the morning, and 
after dinner a ball game was 
played. 

13 — The camping parties returned 
in time to see Lee win the 
Senior and Winstead the Jun- 
ior Stay-at-Home tennis tour- 
naments. "Archie" was fa- 
vored in the afternoon. 

14 — Two walks were taken, one 
to Plymouth Mountain, the 
other around the camp bound- 
aries. After Retreat a pro- 
gram of motion pictures and 
a farce was offered. 

15 — Rain forced Mr. Ned to cut 
short his absorbing sermon on 
"Honesty." The day's Tree 
Talk was delivered by Mr. 
Scull in Baird Hall. All the 
letters were in by supper time! 
A fine camp meeting was held 
in the evening. 

16 — A rainy morning caused a huge 
ping-pong tournament to be 
organized, but a sunny after- 
noon permitted baseball. 
"Dusky" Brownell, '21, and 
"Nat" Pope, '21, arrived, while 
"Jack" Monroe, '20, departed. 

17 — A crew morning was followed 
by a baseball afternoon: Team 
C defeated B, 6-3, in the first 
game of the Counsellors 
League. 

18 — A smoke haze started the 
rumor that Bear Mountain was 
on fire. Messrs. Sagebeer and 
Macomber were "the bears 
that went over the mountain," 
reporting later that the other 
side was all that they could 
see. Team A won from D. 
8-3. 

\ ( ) — Water Sports preliminaries 
were the order of the day, be- 
fore "Doc" closed shop until 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



75 



four o'clock because of the 
heat. After Retreat "Com- 
rades" Kennedy and Spaeth re- 
tained the Quoit Championship 
by defeating Messrs. Thomp- 
son and Codman. "Miff" 
Frothingham, '00, arrived. 
20 — Another day of preliminaries, 
one of these being the annual 
trunk inspection. "Archie" 

was again honored. 




21 — This was a day of walks: 
the Sub-Juniors hiked to San- 
born's Beach, the Juniors, un- 
der Mr. Ned, by a short route 
to Welton Falls, and the Sen- 
iors to Hebron — a new hike 
to be called hereafter the 
"Kennedy Falls" Walk! We 
were entertained in the play- 
house as usual in the evening. 
Mr. Sargent, '17, paid a short 
visit. 

22 — The chapel sermon, on playing 
fair with oneself, was delivered 
by Mr. Jackson. Mr. Rob- 
bins' excellent Tree Talk on 
"Courage" was followed at 
campfire by the reading of "A 
Message to Garcia." 

23 — More of the preliminaries were 
run off. Mr. Ned and Mr. 



Jackson, as captains, waged a 
novel battle with a monster 
push ball. "Dusky" Brownell 
'21, and "Nat" Pope, '22, left 
Camp, and "Tommy" Hawes, 
y 22, "Dick" Hoyt, '05, and 
Horace Cator, '16, arrived. 

24 — "Jim" Sanford captured the 
much-desired green grass 
snake. Preliminaries, push- 
ball, and Ibaseball filled up the 
day. 

25 — Rain produced a rather un- 
eventful day, with ping-pong, 
rehearsals, and singing on the 
program. 

26 — Mr. Macomber gave baseball 
instruction in the afternoon, 
and after supper a private dress 
rehearsal of the Water Sports 
plays was held. "Miff" Froth- 
ingham, '00, departed from our 
midst. 

27 — A day of rest and anticipation. 
After Retreat Mr. Lodge pre- 
sented the last rehearsal of 
"Political Promises" and "The 
Crimson Cocoanut" in the Pas- 
quaney Theatre. 




Juuy -z& 

28 — Water Sports day. Our 
guests, undaunted by the dis- 
agreeable rain, saw Winstead 
win General Excellence and 



7 6 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



Ames Sub-Junior General Ex- 
cellence. (Messrs. Hoy t , 
Beebe, and Payson were the 
judges). Then, after enjoying 
refreshments, the visitors 
flocked to the Theatre to see 
the two plays. Singing and 
the presentation of prizes in 
Baird Hall completed one of 
best of Pasquaney's Water 
Sports days. 

29 — All our guests braved the 
rain to attend chapel in Baird 
Hall, there to enjoy Mr. Ned's 
sermon on "Perseverance." 
The record-breaking Clearpool 
Camp offering passed $416. 
"Dick" Hoyt, '05, and Horace 
Cator, '16, left Camp. 

30— The famed "Week of (all the) 
Rest" commenced. "Eddie" 
Berwind, '22, arrived for a 
visit. 

31 — Disagreeable weather forced a 
quiet day. At campfire Mr. 
Jackson entertained us with 
reading about man-eating 
Tsavo lions. 
Aug. 1 — The selection for the Long 
Walk was announced. Mr. 
Spaeth, of the "Annual," 
started his indomitable, annual 
"ad" campaign! After dinner 
Team B overcame A on the 
ball field, 7-6. 
2 — A quite quiet day. "Dave" 
Grant cleared up the mystery 
of "Friday?" 'by announcing 
the coming circus. 
3 — The great and astounding Pas- 
quaney Circus appears: the 
Tunnel, the Blobs, Dr. Clinic, 
and Mile. Melachrino were 
some of the outstanding fea- 
tures. Afterwards the annual 
White Pine supper was given 
for the whole Camp. 
4 — I) ue to extreme heat, all ac- 
tivities, including the walk, 



were suppressed. "Jack" Col- 
gate, '20, and "Bunny" Day, 
'21, visited Camp. "The Last 
Rehearsal" and several other 
amusing plays and reels were 
presented after Retreat. 

5 — The Rev. Mr. Haight cele- 
brated Holy Communion in 
Chapel at 6:30 a. m. He also 
took the noon service and gave 
us a splendid address on 
"Playing the Game." Mr. 
Sagebeer's Tree Talk was on 
the subject of "Friendship," 
"Bill" Sanford, '22, and "Alec" 
Phelps, y 22, remained for din- 
ner. 

6 — "Bob," the buggy, and the 
Long Walkers set out early 
for Lafayette. "Jim" Bovaird, 
y 22, arrived for a visit. In the 
Junior Baseball League the 
Shredded Wheats defeated the 
Oatmeals, 11-3. 

7 — In the morning there was ping- 
pong, wherein "Jack" Clarke 
was victorious, and in the 
afternoon Junior baseball, 
wherein the Post Toasties de- 
feated the Corn Flakes, 16-10. 
"Ole Skjarsen" was initiated 
in the campfire reading. 



, I , 




8 — The Cardigan walkers set out 
at last, followed by "Sandy" 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



77 



and Mr. Jackson. Later the 
Shredded Wheats, by beating 
the Post Toasties, 14-13, won 
the Junior baseball champion- 
ship. 
9 — The departure of the Sub-Jun- 
ior camping parties finally took 
place. Baseball and tennis 
and Edgar A. Poe entertained 
the diminished Camp. 

10 — The Cardigan walkers returned 
with Mr. Jackson and "Sandy" 
still with them! In the after- 
noon, canoe parties fared to 
Sanborn's Beach. 

11 — A day of returns: After soak 
the young camping parties 
came in, and just before sup- 
per the triumphantly songful 
Long Walkers. An original 
radio concert and several other 
interesting numbers amused 
the returned wanderers. Mr. 
H. M. Kidder, '00, was in 
Camp for lunch. 

12 — Mr. Ned preached a splendid 
sermon at Chapel on "Cour- 
age"; and Mr. Bradley gave a 
Tree Talk on "The Force of 
Example." A chatty Camp 
meeting was held after sup- 
per. "Eddie" Berwind, '22, 
left Camp, and Eliot Grant, 
'21, arrived. 

13 — Mr. Moody and his official 
camera furnished the day's 
principal excitement. "Joe" 

Jeanes, '20, arrived. 

14 — Crew practice, canoe tests, and 
baseball were the order of the 
day: D won a close ball game 
from B, 12-11. There was 
more "Siwashing" at campfire. 

15 — Baseball preponderated: in the 
morning the Oatmeals defeated 
the Corn Flakes, 5-4, and in 
the afternoon "Bolt" Win- 
penny's Team C won the 



championship of the Counsel- 
lor's League by defeating 
Team A, 6-4. 
16 — All four crews were time- 
trialed. "Joe" Vetterlein, by 
swimming the half-mile in 
13:11, established a new Camp 
record. 




17 — Mr. Hinchman presented the 
annual Picture Exhibit, more 
stupendous than ever. "Dick" 
Berresford and "Jim" Henning 
were granted Canoe Privilege. 
(Mr. Ned established another 
Camp record by not saying 
"Canoe Permission"!) 

18 — Pictures morn and eve! In 
the morning there were more 
Moody pictures, and after Re- 
treat more reel pictures. In 
addition to the latter the Pas- 
quaney Stock Co. presented 
"The Maniac," a highly con- 
centrated melodrama! "Joe" 
Jeanes, '20, departed. 

19 — Mr. Ned spoke on the vital 
subject of "Friendship" at the 
Chapel service in Baird Hall. 
After the Council meeting Mr. 
Thompson was justly applaud- 
ed for his Tree Talk on "Nine 
Weeks at Pasquaney vs. Ten 
Months Elsewhere." "Prexy" 



78 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Berresford called a Camp 
Meeting after duties to arouse 
enthusiasm in crew and tennis. 
"Bill" Sanford, '22, and "Alec" 
Phelps, '22, arrived for a 
week's visit. 

20 — Practice in crew, tennis, and 
baseball was in vogue. At 
camp fire Mr. Thompson read 
"His Soul Goes Marching On." 
"El" Grant, '21, left Camp, but 
"Rod" Beebe, '05, arrived. 

21 — There were more trials for the 
suffering crew men. Miss 
Simpson gave the Camp a de- 
licious lemonade-and-cake treat 
in the afternoon at the Farm 
House. 

22 — Before Soak the Shredded 
Wheats won the Junior Base- 
ball Championship by "shred- 
ding" the Corn Flakes, 17-0. 
After dinner the boys sat on 
the Council, 11-10, in a thril- 
ling baseball match. Later 
Mr. Bradley ran the crew men. 

23 — This was a "final" day: in the 
morning "Gus" Bankson and 
"Billy" Winstead won t'he Jun- 
ior Tennis Doubles champion- 
ship by beating "Sonny" Hol- 
lister and Sheldon Roots, 6-1, 
6-1; in the afternoon "Charlie" 
Sargent won a beautifully 
played match from "Jim" 
Ames in the championship 
Sub-Junior Singles tourna- 
ment. 

24 — The thrilling crew races were 
held in rough water. In both 
contests. Junior and Senior, 
the Dana crews defeated the 
Birch. Thruston Morton, '22, 
visited. 

25 — Tennis finals. In the morn- 
ing, between showers, Lillard 
and Gray won the Senior 



Doubles Championship by de- 
feating "Eddie" Rakestraw and 
Ivy Lee. In the afternoon 
Ames and Buell won the Sub- 
Junior Doubles match from 
Munson and Cann; "Johnny" 
Lindsay defeated "Charlie" 
Stanwood in the Junior Singles 
championship match; and Ivy 
Lee finally won the Senior 
Singles match and the 1923 
Camp championship from 
"Jack" Hinchman after a gruel- 
ling contest, 8-6, 3-6, 6-2, 
4-6, 7-5. At the Sigma Alpha 
Tea in the evening Miss Beck- 
with presented the various 
cups. 

26 — Mr. Ned gave his heart-to- 
heart talk in Chapel on "Pur- 
ity." In the late afternoon 
Air. Crosman delivered a Tree 
Talk on "Pasquaney's Job." 
After supper statistics were 
voted upon in Baird Hall. The 
Council spent a sleepless night 
in the office! 

27 — The day was given over to 
final preparations for depart- 
ure. The annual crew feed 
was held in the evening. After 
dinner the Counsellors said 
their farewells, and "Dick" 
Berresford was awarded the 
Most Faithful Boy cup and 
"Don" Murchie the Ray Bige- 
low cup for Sportsmanship. 
There was no campfire. 

28 — The Camp dispersed during 
the day, a small party depart- 
ing at 7:00, the Boston party 
at 11:00, and the New York 
party at 4:30, leaving Mr. Ned. 
Mr. Jackson, and Mr. Kennedy 
in sole possession of the 
Camp. Farewell to the season 
of 1923! 

Charles D. Gowing. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



79 



BOYS' RECORDS 



Ames, James B. ; age 12. Wayland 
Public School, '24. Pasquaney, 
'23. Winner Sub-Junior Ob- 
stacle Race, '23 ; Second, 25- 
Yards Swim, '23 ; Sub-Junior 
General Excellence, '23, Water 
Sports Play Cast, '23. Captain 
of Junior Baseball Team, '23. 
Winner Sub-Junior Tennis 
Doubles, '23. 

Anthony, E. Kelly; age 11. Poly- 
technic Elementary and High 
School, '28. Pasquaney, '22, 
'23. 

Bankson, Lloyd, 2nd ; age 13. Hav- 
erford, '27. Pasquaney, '21, 
'22, '23. Winning Junior Base- 
ball Team, '22. Winner, Junior 
Tennis Doubles, '23. 

Beckwith, Philip Van D. ; age 15. 
Kent School, '26. Pasquaney, 
'18, '19, '20, '21, '22, '23. Win- 
ner of Canoe Tilt, '21. Long 
Walk, '21, '22, '23. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '20, '21 ; 
Winning Senior Baseball Team, 
'22. Annual Board, '22, '23. 
Chapel Boy, '23. 

Beebe, Roderick, Jr. ; age 12. Mar- 
ion Grammar School, '23. Pas- 
quaney, '22, '23. Winning Jun- 
ior Baseball Team, '22 ; Win- 
ning Senior Baseball Team, '23. 

Berresford, Richard C. ; age 16. 
Horace Mann, '24. Pasquaney, 



'19, '20, '21, '22, '23. Winner, 
Sub-Junior Obstacle Race, '19; 
Sub-Junior 25-Yards Swim, '19; 
Sub-Junior General Excellence, 
'19. Second in Junior 50- Yards 
Swim, '22. Winning Senior 
Baseball Team, '20. Cox., Dana 
Junior Crew, '19; Cox., Junior 
Exhibition Crew, '20; Cox., 
Birch Junior Crew, '20; Cox., 
Exhibition Crew, '21 ; Cox. and 
Captain, Dana Senior Crew. '21, 
'22 ; Cox. and Captain, Dana 
Exhibition Crew, '22; Junior 
Exhibition Crew, '23 ; Stroke 
and Captain, Birch Junior Crew, 
'23. W T inner, Junior Tennis 
Doubles, '21. Long Walk, '23. 
Stage Hand, '23. Canoe Privi- 
lege, '23. Color Guard, '23. 
Annual Board, '22, '23. Presi- 
dent, Camp Society, '23. Cap- 
tain of Industry, '23. Yale Cup, 
'22. Thomas Hike Cup, '23. 
Most Faithful Boy, '23. 

Biddle, Robert, 3rd; age 11. West- 
field Friends School, '23. Pas- 
quaney, '23. Captain Junior 
Baseball Team, '23. Third in 
Sub-Junior 25-Yards Swim, '23. 

Blabon, H. Dick; age 12. Haver- 
ford, '30. Pasquaney, '23. 

Brainard, Edward M. ; age 12. West 
Middle District School, '25. 
Pasquaney, '23. Winning Jun- 
ior Baseball Team, '23. 



8o 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Brewster, George W. ; age 15. Phil- 
lips Exeter Academy, '25. Pas- 
quaney, '22, '23. Water Sports 
Play Cast, '22, '23. Dana Jun- 
ior Crew, '22 ; Junior Exhibi- 
tion Crew, '23 ; Winning Dana 
Senior Crew, '23. Long Walk, 
'23. 

Buell, Robert C, Jr. ; age 12. Noah 
Webster School, '24. Pasqua- 
ney, '22, '23. Winner, Sub- 
Junior Tennis Doubles, 23. 

Bulkeley, Richard B., Jr.; age 11. 
Kingswood School, '29. Pas- 
quaney, '23. 

Burrall, Henry D. ; age 12. Mc- 
Ternan's School. Pasquaney, 
'23. Winning Junior Baseball 
Team, '23. 

Cann, Barry B., Jr.; age 12. Mc- 
Ternan's School. Pasquaney, 
'23. 

Carleton, William T. ; age 10. 
Country Day School, '31. Pas- 
quaney, '23. 

Cator, Franklin P. ; age 13. Gilman 
Country School, '28. Pasqua- 
ney, '22, '23. Natural History 
Prize Collection, '22. 

Church, Edgar M., Jr. ; age 13. St. 
George's School, '27. Pasqua- 
ney, '20, '21, '22, '23. Winner, 
Sub-Junior Dingey Race, '21. 
Winning Junior Baseball Team, 
'22. 

Clarke, John A. ; age 13. Winches- 
ter High School, '27. Pasqua- 
ney, '21, '22, '23. Winner, Sub- 
Junior 25- Yards Swim, '21 ; 
Sub-Junior General Excellence, 
'21 ; Third in Junior 50- Yards 



Swim, '22; Winner, Witherbee 
Black Obstacle Race, '23. Cox., 
Winning Birch Junior Crew, 
'22. 

Codman, Daniel S. ; age 17. Santa 
Barbara School (Carpinteria, 
Calif.), '26. Pasquaney, '20, 
'21, '22, '23. Winner, Junior 
Canoe Race, '22. Play Cast, 
'20, '23. Long Walk, '23. Cap- 
tain, Junior Baseball Team, '22 ; 
Winning Senior Baseball Team, 
'23. 

Codman, Samuel E. ; age 15. St. 
Mark's, '27. Pasquaney, '20, 
'21, '22, '23. Winner, Sub-Jun- 
ior 25-Yards Swim, '20; Second 
in Sub-Junior Obstacle Race, 
'20 ; Sub-Junior General Excel- 
lence, '20. Long Walk, '23. 

Colgate, Samuel; age 11. Brown- 
ing School, '26. Pasquaney, 
'23. Winning Junior Baseball 
Team, '23. 

Curtis, John N. ; age 14. Penn 
Charter School, '27. Pasqua- 
ney, '22, '23. Long Walk, '22, 
'23. Birch Junior Crew, '23. 
Color Guard, '23. 

Dana, Richard H., 3rd; age 11. 
Lincoln School, '29. Pasqua- 
ney, '23. 

Day, F. Tallmadge ; age 11. Pel- 
ham Manor Day School, '26. 
Pasquaney, '22, '23. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '23. 

Deacon, Herbert J.; age 13. Mon- 
tieth School, '24. Pasquaney, 
'23. Winning Junior Baseball 
Team, '23. 

De La Cour, Willis S. ; age 15. Hill 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



81 



School, '27. Pasquaney, '19, 
'20, '21, '22, '23. Winning Jun- 
ior Baseball Team, '20, '21. 
Long Walk, '23. 

de Rham, Richard D. ; age 12. Law- 
rence Smith School, '26. Pas- 
quaney, '22, '23. 

Eliot, Thomas H. ; age 16. Har- 
vard, '28. Pasquaney, '21, '22, 
'23. Winning Senior Canoe, 
'21. Long Walk, '22, '23. Win- 
ning Senior Baseball Team, '23. 
Birch Junior Crew, '21 ; Stroke 
and Captain, Birch Exhibition 
and Birch Senior Crews, '22 ; 
Senior Exhibition Crew, '23 ; 
Stroke and Captain, Birch Sen- 
ior Crew, '23. Captain of In- 
dustry, '23. Annual Board, '23. 

Fitler, Ralston B. ; age 14. Mont- 
gomery School, '27. Pasqua- 
ney, '23. 

Fobes, Joseph W. ; age 12. Miss 
Fine's School (Princeton), '24. 
Pasquaney, '23. 

Follis, Richard H., Jr. ; age 14. Gil- 
man Country School, '27. Pas- 
quaney, '23. 

Fuller, William W., 2nd.; age 12. 
Cottage School (Pinehurst, N. 
C), '25. Pasquaney, '23. Cap- 
tain of Junior Baseball Team, 
'23. 

Goodrich, Charles C. ; age 16. Pom- 
fret, '24. Pasquaney, '20, '21, 
'22, '23. Cox., Winning Dana 
Junior Crew, '21. Canoe Privi- 
lege, '23. 

Gowing, Charles D. ; age 18. Coun- 
try Day School, '24. Pasqua- 



ney, '19, '20, '21, '22, '23. Water 
Sports Play Cast, '22, '23. 
Long Walk, '20, '22, '23. Birch 
Exhibition Crew and Birch Sen- 
ior Crew, '22 ; Winning Dana 
Junior Crew, '23. Natural His- 
tory Prize Essay," '22. Captain 
of Industry, '22, '23. Annual 
Board, '21, '22, '23. 

Gowing, Robert B. ; age 15. Coun- 
try Day School, '25. Pasqua- 
ney, '19, '20, '21, '22, '23. Water 
Sports Play Cast, '22, '23. Win- 
ning Senior Baseball Team, 
'20. Annual Board, '23. 

Grant, George H. ; age 13. Private 
Tutor. Pasquaney, '22, '23. 

Gray, Robert; age 15. Phillips An- 
dover, '27. Pasquaney, '20, '21, 
'22, '23. Winning Senior Base- 
ball Team, '21 ; Captain of Sen- 
ior Baseball Team, '22, '23. 
Long Walk, '20, '21, '22. Win- 
ner, Junior Tennis Singles, '20 ; 
Winner, Junior Tennis Dou- 
bles, '20; Winner, Senior Ten- 
nis Doubles, '23. 

Harding, Francis A.; age 15. St. 
Mark's, '26. Pasquaney, '22, 
'23. Stage Hand, '23. Win- 
ner, Canoe Tilt, '23. Winning 
Senior Baseball Team, '23. 
Long W r alk, '22, '23. Stroke, 
Dana Junior Crew, '22 ; Stroke, 
Junior Exhibition Crew, '23 ; 
Winning Dana Senior Crew, 
'23. 

Harding, John B. ; age 11. Fay 
School, '25. Pasquaney, '22, 
'23. 



82 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



Harris, William McC, Jr.; age 14. 
Hotchkiss, '27. Pasquaney, '23. 
Winning Junior Baseball Team, 
'23. 

Hart, David S. ; age 12. McTer- 
nan's School, '24. Pasquaney, 
'22, '23. Winning Junior Base- 
hall Team, '22. 

Hawes, Edmund T. ; age 12. Rog- 
er's Grammar School, '24. Pas- 
quaney, '21, '22, '23. Second in 
Sub-Junior 25-Yards Swim, '21 ; 
Winner, '22; Third in Junior 
50-Yards Swim, '23. Play Cast, 
'21. Cox., Dana Junior Crew, 
'22 ; Cox., Winning Dana Junior 
Crew, '23. Winner, Sub-Junior 
Tennis Doubles, '22. 

Henning, Basil D. ; age 13. Louis- 
ville Normal, '24. Pasquaney, 
'21, '22, '23. Natural History 
IVize Collection, '21 ; Research 
Medal, '22; Prize Essay, '23. 

Henning, James W., 3rd; age 16. 
Pomfret, '25. Pasquaney, '20, 
'21, '22, '23. Water Sports Play 
Cast, '22, '23. Captain Junior 
Baseball Team C, '21. Cox., 
Winning Birch Senior Crew, 
'21 ; Cox., Birch Exhibition 
Crew and Birch Senior Crew, 
'22. Captain of Industry, '23. 
Canoe Privilege, '23. Annual 
Board, '21, '22, '23. 

llinchman, David B. ; age 16. Phil- 
lips Exeter, '24. Pasquaney, 
'19, '20, '21, '22, '23. Winning 
Senior Baseball Team, '22; Cap- 
tain, Senior Baseball Team, '23. 
Long Walk, '20, '21, '22, '23. 



Birch Junior Crew, '22; Senior 
Exhibition Crew. '23 ; Birch 
Senior Crew, '23. Canoe Privi- 
lege, '22, '23. Secretary of 
Camp Society, '23. Captain of 
Industry, '22, '23. 

Hinchman, John M., 2nd; age 15. 
Phillips Exeter, '25. Pasqua- 
ney, '20, '21, '22, '23. Third in 
Sub-Junior 25-Yards Swim, '20. 
Winning Senior Baseball Team, 
'20, '22. Long Walk. '22, '23. 
Winner, Junior Tennis Singles, 
'21. 

Hollister, Buell ; age 11. Corning 
Junior High School, '26. Pas- 
quaney, '22, '23. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '23. 

Hollister, Henry C. ; age 15. St. 
John's School, Manlius, '26. 
Pasquaney, '20, '21, '22, '23. 
Camp Bugler, '23. 

Howland, John, Jr. ; age 16. Phil- 
lips Exeter, '24. Pasquaney, 
'20, '21, '22, '23. Second in Sen- 
ior 100-Yards Swim, '23 ; Win- 
ning Senior Canoe Crew. '23. 
W T ater Sports Play Cast, '20. 
'23. Long Walk, '21, '22. Win- 
ning Birch Junior Crew, '22; 
Birch Junior Crew, '2^. Canoe 
Privilege, '23. Camp Half- 
Mile Record, '23. 

Hoyt, Whitney F. ; age 13. Kalbfus 
School. Pasquaney, '22, '23. 
Natural History Prize Collec- 
tion, '23. 

Hufnagel, Frederick B., Jr.; age 12. 
Sewickley Preparatory School. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



83 



'27. Pasquaney, '22, '23. Nat- 
ural History Original Research 
Medal, '23. 

Jefferson, Floyd W., Jr. ; age 12. 
Short Hills Academy, '25. 
Pasquaney, '22, '23. 

Jefferson, T. Louis; age 13. Stuy- 
vesant School, '29. Pasquaney, 
'21, '22, '23. Winning Junior 
Baseball Team, '21, '23. Win- 
ner, Sub-Junior Tennis Singles, 
'21 ; Sub-Junior Tennis Dou- 
bles, '21. . 

Keyser, W. Fenwick ; age 11. Gil- 
man Country School, '29. Pas- 
quaney, '23. 

King, H. Thorn, Jr. ; age 16. Priv- 
ate Tutor. Pasquaney, '20, '21, 
'22, '23. Winner, Canoe Tilt, 
'23. Long Walk, '21, '22, '23. 
Winning Birch Junior Crew, 
'22 ; Winning Dana Senior 
Crew, '23. Color Guard, '23. 

Lee, Ivy L., Jr. ; age 14. Hotchkiss, 
'27. Pasquaney, '22, '23. 

Water Sports Play Cast, '23. 
Long Walk, '23. Winning Sen- 
ior Baseball Team, '23. Win- 
ner, Junior Tennis Singles, '22 ; 
Winner, Senior Tennis Singles 
and Camp Tennis Champion- 
ship, '23. 

Leonard, Frederick N. ; age 13. 
Groton, '28. Pasquaney, '21, 
'22, '23. Winning Senior Canoe 
Crew, '23. Long Walk, '23. 

Lillard, Walter H., Jr.; age 15. 
Tabor Academy, '26. Pasqua- 
ney, '20, '21, '22, '23. Third in 
Junior 50- Yards Swim, '20. 



Captain, Senior Baseball Team, 
21, '22, '23. Long Walk, '22. 
Winning Dana Junior Crew, '23. 
Winner, Junior Tennis Doubles, 
'20 ; Winner, Senior Tennis 
Doubles, '23. Canoe Privilege, 
'22, '23. Mail Committee, '23. 
Vice-President, Camp Society, 
'23. Captain of Industry, '22, 
'23. Ray Bigelow Cup, '22. 

Lindsay, E. Caldwell, Jr. ; age 15. 
Haverford, '24. Pasquaney, 
'19, '20, '21, '22, '23. Long 
Walk, '23. Captain, Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '22. 
Birch Junior Crew, '23. 

Lindsay, John F. ; age 13. Hotch- 
kiss, '27. Pasquaney, '21, '22, 
'23. Winner, Sub-Junior Ding- 
ey Race, '22 ; Winner, Junior 
Canoe Race, '23. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '21, '22. 
Winner, Junior Tennis Singles, 
'23. 

Lloyd, Carrington M. ; age 13. 
Country Day School, '29. Pas- 
quaney, '22, '23. 

McCarthy, Billy P. ; age 12. Shakes- 
peare School, '25. Pasquaney, 
'23. 

McCarthy, Clarence A., Jr. ; age 14. 
Shakespeare School, '24. Pas- 
quaney, '23. 

Mcllvain, Gibson ; age 12. Haver- 
ford, '29. Pasquaney, '23. 
Winning Junior Baseball Team, 
'23. 

Miller, Huntington ; age 16. Pom- 
fret, '25. Pasquaney, '19, '20, 
'21, '22, '23. Winning Junior 



8 4 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



Canoe, '21 ; Winning Senior 
Canoe Crew, '23. Stage Hand, 
'21 ; Water Sports Play Cast, 
'22, '23. Senior Exhibition 
Crew, '23; Stroke and Captain, 
Winning Dana Junior Crew, 
'23. Canoe Privilege, '23. 

Captain of Industry, '23. 

Munson, Townsend; age 11. Mont- 
gomery School, '28. Pasqua- 
ney, '22, '23. Winner, Sub-Jun- 
ior Dingey Race, '23. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '23. 
Annual Board, '22, '23. 

Murchie, Donald; age 17. Santa 
Barbara School (Carpinteria, 
Calif.). Pasquaney, '20, '21, 
'22, '23. Second in Junior 50- 
Yards Swim, '20; Second in 
Senior 100- Yards Swim, '22; 
Third, '23. Winning Senior 
Canoe, '22 ; Second, Witherbee 
Black Obstacle Race, '23. Stage 
Hand, '21 ; Water Sports Play 
Cast, '22, "23. Long Walk, '21, 
'22, '23. Captain Dana Junior 
Crew, '22; Senior Exhibition 
Crew, '23 ; Stroke and Captain, 
Winning Dana Senior Crew, 
'23. Prize Essay, '21. Canoe 



Privilege, '22, '23 



Grand 



Bouncer, Camp Society, '23. 
Captain of Industry, '22, '23. 
Thomas Hike Cup, '22. Yale 
Cup, '23. Ray Bigelow Cup, 
'23. Annual Board, '22, '23. 
Murchie, Guy, Jr.; age 16. Kent 
School, '25. Pasquaney, '20, 
'21, '22, '23. Long Walk, '21. 
'22, '23. Winning Junior Base- 



ball Team, '21, '22. Winning 
Birch Junior Crew, '22; Birch 
Senior Crew, '23. Natural His- 
tory Prize Essay, '20; Original 
Research Medal, '21. 

Newlin, H. Kenton; age 13. Hav- 
erford, '28. Pasquaney, '21, 
'23. Winning Junior Baseball 
Team, '21. 

Xields, Robert L. ; age 9. Miss 
Line's School (Princeton), '23. 
Pasquaney, '23. 

Ogden, Kenneth C, Jr.; age 11. 
Sewanoy School, '25. Pasqua- 
ney, '23. Captain of Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '23. 

Owen, Percy, Jr.; age 15. Hotch- 
kiss, '24. Pasquaney, '20, '21, 
'22, '23. Third in Diving, '20; 
Second, '21, '22, '23; Winner of 
Junior 50- Yards Swim, '21. 
Captain of Industry, '23. 

Payson, George S., 2nd ; age 12. 
Butler Grammar School, '24. 
Pasquaney, '23. 

Rakestraw, Edward H. ; age 14. 
Haverford School, '26. Pas- 
quaney, '21, '22, '23. Second in 
Sub-Junior 25-Yards Swim, '22 ; 
Winner, Sub-Junior Obstacle 
Race, '22 ; Sub-Junior General 
Excellence, '22; Winner, Junior 
50- Yards Swim, '23 ; Winner. 
Junior Canoe Race, '23; Cox., 
Senior Exhibition Crew. '23 ; 
Cox., Winning Dana Senior 
Crew, '23. Winning Senior 
Baseball Team, '22, '23. Win- 
ner, junior Tennis Doubles, '22. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



85 



Rakestraw, John L. ; age 18. Hav- 
erford School, '24. Pasquaney, 
'19, '20, '21, '22, '23. Winning 
Senior Canoe Crew, '23. Water 
Sports Play Stage Hand, '21 ; 
Stage Manager, '22, '23. Win- 
ning Junior Baseball Team, '21. 
Librarian, '23. Captain of In- 
dustry, '23. 

Reed, Frank O. ; age 17. Yale, '27. 
Pasquaney, '20, '21, '22, '23. 
Water Sports Play Stage Hand, 
'21 ; Electrician, '22, '23 ; Prop- 
erty Manager, '23. Winning 
Senior Baseball Team, '22. 
Captain of Industry, '22, '23. 
Annual Board, '21, '22, '23. 

Ritchie, Edwin W. ; age 15. St. 
Paul Academy. Pasquaney, 
'21, '22, '23. Third in Diving, 
'21, '22. Water Sports Play 
Cast, '23. Junior Exhibition 
Crew, '23 ; Birch Senior Crew, 
'23. Long Walk, '21, '22, '23. 
Captain of Industry, '23. 

Roots, Sheldon; age 15. Kent 
School, '27. Pasquaney, '23. 

Sanford, Leonard J. ; age 13. Weiss 
School, '24. Pasquaney, '21, 
'22, '23. Winning Junior Base- 
ball Team, '21, '22. 

Sargent, Charles S., 3rd; age 10. 
Bovee School, '26. Pasquaney, 
'23. Winner, Sub-Junior Ten- 
nis Singles, '23. 

Sargent, Wlnthrop, 3rd ; age 12. 
Haverford School, '29. Pas- 
quaney, '23. 

Scull, Theodore C. ; age 13. Epis- 
copal Academy, '28. Pasqua- 



ney, '21, '22, '23. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '23. 

Shaffer, Newton M., 3rd; age 11. 
Pine Lodge, '25. Pasquaney, 
'23. 

Stanwood, Charles F. ; age 13. 
Brunswick High School, '27. 
Pasquaney, '21, '22, '23. Cox., 
Junior Exhibition Crew, '23 ; 
Cox., Birch Senior Crew, '23. 
Winning Junior Baseball Team, 
'21, '22. Winning Senior Base- 
ball Team, '23. Winner, Sub- 
Junior Tennis Singles, and Sub- 
Junior Tennis Doubles, '22. 

Taylor, Irving; age 10. Elmer 
Avenue School, '24. Pasqua- 
ney, '23. 

Thaw, Edward, Jr. ; age 13. Milton 
Academy, '27. Pasquaney, '23. 

Thompson, Wirt L., Jr. ; age 12. 
Meadowbrook School, '25. Pas- 
quaney, '23. Winner, Sub-Jun- 
ior 25-Yards Swim, '23. 

Townsend, William K. ; age 11. 
Brunswick School (Greenwich 
Conn.). Pasquaney, '22, '23. 

Tracy, Laurence E. ; age 13. Buck- 
ley School, '25. Pasquaney, '21, 
'22, '23. Third in Sub-Junior 
25-Yards Swim, '22. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '22. 

Vetterlein, Joseph R., Jr. ; age 14. 
Haverford School, '27. Pas- 
quaney, '22, '23. Winner, Jun- 
ior 50- Yards Swim, '22 ; Win- 
ner, Senior 100- Yards Swim, 
'23 ; Record One-Milej Swim, 
'22. Winning Dana Junior 
Crew, '23. 



86 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



White Austin T., Jr.; age 17. 
Ridgefield School. '26. Pas- 
quaney, 16, '17, '18, '19, '20, 
'21. '23. Winning Senior 

Canoe Crew, '21. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '21. 
Long Walk, '20, '23. Captain 
of Industry, '23. Annual Board, 
'20, '21, '23. 

Wihpenny, J. Bolton, 2nd; age 15. 
Phillips Exeter Academy, '27. 
Pasquaney, '18, '19, '20, '21, '22, 
'23. Winner, Sub-Junior 25- 
* Yards Swim, '18; Winner, Sub- 
Junior Obstacle Race, '18; Sub- 
Junior General Excellence, '18; 
Winner, Junior 50- Yards Swim, 
'20; Winner of Diving, '21; 
Third in Diving, '23 ; Third in 
100-Yards Swim, '21, '22; Win- 
ner of General Excellence, '21. 
Winning Senior and Junior 
Baseball Teams, '21 ; Captain 



of Winning Senior Baseball 
Team, '23. Long Walk, '21, '22, 
'23. Cox.. Birch Senior Crew. 
'20. Winner. Sub-Junior Tennis 
Singles and Sub-Junior Tennis 
Doubles, '19. Mail Committee. 
'23. Harvard Cup for Baseball, 
'23. 

Winstead, William H., Jr.; age 13. 
Gilman Country School, '28. 
Pasquaney, '22. '23. Second in 
Junior 50- Yards Swim. '23; 
Winner of Diving, '23 ; Winner 
of General Excellence. '23. 
Water Sports Play Cast, '23. 
Winning Senior Baseball Team. 
'23. Winner, Junior Tennis 
Doubles, '23. Cox.. Birch Jun- 
ior Crew, '23. 

Wurst, Perry E., Jr. ; age 14. Hav- 
erford School, '26. Pasquaney. 
'22, '23. Long Walk. '23. 




THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 87 



CAMP RECORDS 



THE MOST FAITHFUL BOY 



1900 George Garrett 

1901 Chauncey Brewster Garver 

1902 Francis Gilman Blake 

1903 Eliot Carr Cutler 

1904 Roderick Beebe 

1905 Earle Trumbull Williams 

1906 Maurice Cary Blake 

1907 William Christian Bullitt, Jr. 

1908 Roger Sturtevant Kellen 

1909 Nelson Curtis, Jr. 

1910 John Norman Hazen 

1911 Benjamin Bullock, 3d 

1912 John McHenry, Jr. 

1913 Horace Tarr Cator 

1914 Thomas W. Proctor 

1915 James McHenry 

1916 John Gray Bolton 

1917 William Aaron Lippincott, 3d 

1918 Udolpho Theodore Bradley 

1919 William Stackhouse Scull, 2d 

1920 John Cranwill Thompson 

1921 Wallace Parks Ritchie 

1922 Eliot Codman 

1923 Richard Case Berresford 



88 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



WATER SPORTS, 1923 



GENERAL 
William H 



EXCELLENCE 
Winstead, Jr. 



SENIOR 

DIVING 
William H. Winstead, Jr. 

ioo-YARD SWIM 
Joseph R. Vetterlein, Jr. 



WITHERBEE BLACK OBSTACLE 

RACE 

First John A. Clarke 

Second Donald Murchie 



CANOE TILT 
Francis A. Harding 
H. Thorn King, Jr. 



CANOE RACE 

St'm. John Howland, Jr. 

3 J. L. Rakestraw 

2 F. N. Leonard 

Bow Huntington Miller 



JUNIOR 

50-YARD SWIM 
Edward H. Rakestraw 



CANOE RACE 

St'm. John F. Lindsay 

Bow E. H. Rakestraw 

SUB-JUNIOR 

GENERAL EXCELLENCE 
James B. Ames 



25-YARD SWIM 
Wirt L. Thompson, Jr. 



OBSTACLE RACE 
James B. Ames 



DINGEY RACE 

Townsend Munson 



Swimming Record j 



HALF-MILE 
John Howland, Jr., 13:08 



ONE MILE 
Edward T. Hawes, 61:05 



Winning Crews in Shell Rowing 

DANA SENIOR DANA JUNIOR 

St'k I). Mnrchie (Capt.) St'k H. Miller (Capt. ) 
3 H. T. King, Jr. 3 C. D. Gowing 

2 F. A. Harding 2 W. H. Lillard, Jr. 

Bow G. W. Brewster Bow J. R. Vetterlein, Jr. 

Cox E. H. Rakestraw Cox E. T. Howes 
Time 4:27 3-5 Time 3:13 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



89 



SENIOR 



SINGLES 
I. L. Lee, Jr. 



DOUBLES 
Robert Gray 
W. H. Lillard, Jr. 



JUNIOR 



SINGLES 
J. F. Lindsay 



TENNIS, 1923 



SUB-JUNIOR 

SINGLES 

C. S. Sargent, 3rd 



DOUBLES 
R. C. Buell, Jr. 
J. B. Ames 



DOUBLES 
W. H. Winstead, Jr. 
Lloyd Bankson, 2nd 

TENNIS SINGLES CHAMPIONSHIP FOR 1923 

won by 

Ivy L. Lee, Jr. 



RECORD CUPS FOR ATHLETICS 



BIGELOW CUP FOR SPORTSMANSHIP 
Donald Murchie 



HARVARD CUP FOR BASEBALL 
J. Bolton Winpenny, 2nd 



THOMAS HIKE CUP 
Richard C. Berresford 



YALE CUP FOR ROWING 
Donald Murchie 



PARSONS CUP FOR HALF-MILE SWIM 
John Howland, Jr. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



9i 



>si!bsJDSLO^io&:2b«lb& 



8* LOSLD^ l£3K ObSESS 



sG^iBsEosiBs: 






JUraa? patronize our advertisers 
whenever possible. 

®tj* following pages represent the 
genuine interest of many friends 
and patrons of Pasquaney. It is in 
a large measure due to their kind 
generosity that we have been able 
to publish the "Annual" in its pres- 
ent form. To them the Board is 
very grateful and feels that, to show 
its appreciation, the Camp should 
make whatever modest return it 
can. 

(§n? good turns deserves many 
others. 

THL BOARD. 



?& SQ3 SQJ ££3S<3 SS3 £Q] &Q1 S<3 •!§£ 



1SQ1SQ3&QM 



l&Sl&SI&ZKtc 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF THE 

BOYS FROM MAINE 

R. G. 

G. S. P. 2ND 

C. F. S. 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE 

BOYS AND COUNSELLORS 

OF 

St. PAUL MINNESOTA 

H. M. 
E. W. R. 
W. P. R. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 93 



A. W. MOODY 

Photographer to Camp Pasquaney 
by Special Appointment 

... DEALER IN ... 

Kodaks and Kodak Supplies 

Send your Developing and Printing to me for 
Prompt Handling and the Best Possible Results 
from every film. Send me your orders for Last- 
man Film and Kodak Supplies. 

Telephone 8-2 BRISTOL, N. H. 



I Carry Everything That's Worth While in Photography 



94 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



COMPLIMENTS 


of the 


NEW JERSEY BOYS 


R. B. 3rd 


S. C. 


J. W. F. 


H. C. H. 


F. W. J. Jr. 


F. N. L. 


R. L. N. 


N. M. S. 3rd 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 95 



Zhe jfiret Iftational Bank 

BRISTOL, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



ORGANIZED 1898 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00 
Surplus and Undivided Profits, $50,000.00 

H. C. WHIPPLE, President 

WM. C. WHITE, Vice-President and Cashier 

Depositary for Camp Pasquaney 



96 THE PASOUANEV ANNUAL 





THIS SPACE REPRESENTS 




THREE 


FULL PAGES 




CONTRIBUTED BY 


THE 


BOYS AND 


COUNSELLORS 






OF 




PHILADELPHIA AND 


VICINITY 


R. 


B. 3rd 




G. Mel. 


H 


D. B. 




T. M. 


G. 


B. B. 




E. H. R. 


B. 


B. C. 




J. L. R. 


J- 


M. C. 




R. G. S. 


J. 


N. C. 




W. S. 3rd 


W 


. S. D. 




T. C. S. 


R. 


B. F. 




W. S. S. 2nd 


F. 


B. H. Jr. 




J. W. S. Jr. 


D. 


D. K. 




W. L. T. Jr. 


H 


T. K. Jr. 




J. R. V. Jr. 


E. 


C. L. Jr. 




J. B. W. 2nd 


J 


F. L. 







THE PASQUANKY ANNUAL 97 



* COMPLIMENTS |l 

X FROM ^ 

I 8EWICKLEY, PA. t 



T. D. LEONARD ♦ 

* 17© BROADWAY * 

1 NEW YORK CITY ♦ 

* <$♦ 



9 8 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 




This space represents 

ONE AND A HALF FULL PAGES 

contributed by the 

BOYS AND COUNSELLORS 

of 

HAVERFORD SCHOOL 



L. B. 2nd 


G. Mel. 


B. B. C. Jr. 


H. K. N. 


H. D. B. 


E. H. R. 


J. M. C. 


J. L. R. 


E. W. C. J. 


W. S. 3rd 


E. C. L. Jr. 


J. R. V. Jr 


J. F. L. 


P. E. W. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 99 



GOIVIRl-IIVIEIM-rS OF 

NICHOLS, THE FLORIST 

— and — 

GIFT SHOP 



PLYMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



MOSES A. BATCHELDER 



Clothing 

Furnishings 

Boots and Shoes 



PLYMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



IOO 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 






f \ 




COMPLIMENTS OF THE 

KENTUCKY AGGREGATION 

F. G. A. 
U. T. B. 
B. D. H. 
J. W. H. 3RD 



'AC 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 101 




The Kellogg & Bulkeley Co. 

LITHOGRAPHIC 
PRINTERS 

Hartford, Connecticut 

Lithography serves best those who demand the best. 

Lithographed stationery is an index to the character of an 
Institution. 




102 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



THIS SPACE REPRESENTS 

THREE FULL PAGES 

CONTRIBUTED BY 
THE BOYS OF 



i 



NEW YORK AND VICINITY 



R. C. B. 

F. T. D. 
R. D. deR 
J. W. F. 

W. W. F. 2nd 

G. H. G. 

W. McC. H. Jr. 
W. F. H. 



H. T. K. Jr. 
I. L. L. Jr. 
F. N. L. 
K. C. O. 
C. S. S. 3rd 
N. M. S. 3rd 
W. K. T. 
E. S. W. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 103 

w. h. brine: co. 

27 Otis Street 
BOSTON - - MASS. 



©fficial ©utfitters 

to 
Camp Ipasquane^ 



ATHLETIC SUPPLIES FOR ALL SPORTS 

BASEBALL 

BASKET BALL 

FOOTBALL 

HOCKEY 

TENNIS 

TRACK 



w. h. brine: co. 

2 7" Otis Street, Boston, Ma 



io4 THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



COMPLIMENTS 


of the 


OYERBROOK BOYS 


J. N. C. 


E. C. L. Jr. 


J. F. L. 


T. M. 


E. H. R. 


J. L. R. 


J. B. W. 2nd 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 105 

VOLPE BROTHERS 

PLYMOUTH NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Dealers in 

Fruits, Produce, Nuts and 
Confectionery 



Special Attention Given 

Summer Schools and Camp Orders 

Agents for 

IVIoxie, Boston Confectionery, l\le\A/ 
England Confectionery, XA/hitman's 
Candies 



BURTT'S STORE 

.... HAS .... 

Everything That Is Needed to Furnish the Home 

.... ALSO .... 

Building Material and 

Hardware to Build the Home 

Let us serve you 

A. F. BURTT COMPANY 

Telephone 22-2 PLYMOUTH, N. H. 



io6 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 





COMPLIMENTS 
OF THE 

CHICAGO BOYS 

C. A. McC. JR. 
B. P. MCC. 




THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 107 

THE PEMIGEWASSET 

PLYMOUTH, N. H. 

At the Gateway of the White Mountains, elevation 1000 feet. 
Near Lake Winnepesaukee, Newfound Lake and Lake Asquam. 
130 miles from Boston. State road. 30 miles to Profile House, 
40 miles to Bethlehem, 50 miles to Bretton Woods and Crawford 
Notch, 100 miles to Dixville Notch. Four hours from Boston by 
train. Four trains daily. 

All rooms en suite, baths, telephones, steam heat. Supplies from 
our own farm. Open June 15th to November 1st. 

W. F. ADAMS Proprietor 



COFFEY'S PHARMACY 

PLYMOUTH, N. H. 

Is Always on the alert to please its many 
patrons, being fully stocked at all time 
with its several specialties. 

W. R. COFFEY Proprietor 



io8 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 




" The home of the bean and the cod" 



THIS SPACE REPRESENTS 

THREE AND A HALF FULL PAGES 

CONTRIBUTED BY THE 

BOYS AND COUNSELLORS 



H 






OF 



BOSTON AND VICINITY 



J. B. A. 
G. W. B. 
W. T. C. 
J. A. C. 

D. S. C. 

E. C. 

S. E. C. 
T. H. E. 
C. D. G. 
R. B. G. 



D. K. G. 

F. A. H 
J. B. H. 

E. T. H. 

C. M. L. 
W. B. M. 

D. M. 

G. M. Jr. 

E. T. Jr. 

A. T. W. Jr, 



>^^<3^^^S3^S3^S3^^^S^^^^^^^^^^?^^^^^^3^^^^i^ff^^» 



rscn SQ]3&Q3SS3 &9" 1 SS 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 109 

PASQUANEY BOYS 

FOR VOUR CAMR SUPPLIES 

SUCH AS 

Moccasins Goodyear Glove Tennis Shoes 

Bathing Suits Jerseys Sweaters 

Rubber Blankets 

And Everything Needed for Gamp 

GO TO 

COX & BLAKE COMPANY 

CENTRAL SQUARE RRISTOL, N. H. 

MEMBERS OF CAMP PASQUANEY 

...FOR YOUR... 

GROCERIES 

HARDWARE 

PAINT, VARNISH AND 

CAMPERS' SUPPLIES 

...GO TO... 

CAV1S BROTHERS CO. 

5-6 CENTRAL SQUARE BRISTOL, N. H. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO SUMMER RESIDENTS 

You Are Invited to Make Our Store Your Headquarters when in Bristol 



no 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



" Hue venitc, pneri, ut viri sitis" 



I 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF THE 

BOYS AND COUNSELLORS 

OF 

PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY 



D. B. H. 
J. M. H. 2ND 
T. H. H. JR. 
J. H. JR. 
D. M. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



in 



NATIVE POULTRY DRESSING PLANT 

49 NORTH CENTRE ST., BOSTON 



SAUSAGE FACTORY AND SMOKE HOUSES 

BLACKSTONE AND NORTH STS. 



CURING PLANTS 

BOSTON AND CHICAGO 



BATCHELDER & SNYDER CO 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 

WHOLESALE ONLY 




OFFICES AND STORES 
TELEPHONE RICHMOND 3000 



Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sausages 

Poultry, Game 

Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Olives, Oils 

Fresh, Salt and Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH AND NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



ii2 THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



T u Age quod agis" T 

■*• COMPLIMENTS OF THE "f 

•*• •*• 

| ST. MARK'S SCHOOL { 

{ BOYS AND COUNSELLORS I 

* 4. 

f F. G. A. * 

4. D. S. C. ^ 

•#• E. C. ■*• 

* s f r "** 

4- F. A. H. •#• 

4 •#• 

4 •*• 



4 * 

4- ♦ 

•*• •*• 

4. "Afontti Meliora Sequamur" •$• 

J COMPLIMENTS | 

4. -$• 

4- of the •$• 

4. 4 

$ HOTCHKISS SCHOOL BOYS $ 

•#• W. MCC. H. JR. •*• 

I I- L L JR. I 

^ P. 0. JR, ♦$• 

& ♦ 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 113 



ESTABLISHED 1845 



GEO. W. WELSH'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

and Importers 

213 BROADWAY 0PP0S1TE ST PAULS CHAPEL NEW YORK 

NEW ASTOR HOUSE BUILDING 



COMPLETE STOCK OF 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry 

STERLING SILVER AND GOLD 
COLLEGE, SCHOOL AND SOCIETY EMRLEMS 

Medallions a Specialty 
PRIZE CUPS 



Designs and Estimates cheerfully rendered 



ii4 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 





COMPLIMENTS OF THE 

BOYS OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 

P. V. B. 
E. M. B. 
R. C, B. 
R. B. B. JR. 
C. C. G. 




THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 115 



LINDSAY CHAPLET & MFG. CO, 



FOUNDRY CHAPLETS 



HARRISON BUILDING MAECUS HOOK 



PHILADELPHIA, PENNA,, 



COMPLIMENTS 



Hewitt Rubber Company 



MASSACHUSETTS 



BOSTON 



n6 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 




COMPLIMENTS 
OF THE 

KENT SCHOOL 
BOYS AND COUNSELLORS 

P. V. B. 
G. M. 
S. R. 
J. McC. R. 




THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



117 



r2 -at. 

89 1% 



y&i. 



^ E>si23^ E^:i2>S[2>s[2>s[2>s[2>Slo^l2>^ GbsiGb^loS tosODSLb^ lb^ GdSIo^ IbSibsloSE^ lo&Ob&ODSs 



r *** 



CONTINENTAL LEATHER COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA 

MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH GRADE 

OAK SOLE LEATHER 



4T s % 



>£&<7 , &^>$^S<3S^S<53S^SQ3S<^ 



&^£QUSQB8£ESS] -S^^QISQI £<5JI&<5M 



]^&^&93&^&^^^&9]^^&^}^&<23& c 



n8 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



I 



'/// tuo hi 7 nine hi men 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF THE 



GILMAN SCHOOL BOYS 



F. P. C. JR. 
R. H. F. JR. 
J. H. JR. 
W. F. K. 
W. H. W. JR. 



I 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



119 



D&M 

SPORTING GOODS 

COMPLETE OUTFITS 

ROR 

ase Ball Football Basket Ball 

Volley Ball Tennis 



BATHING SUITS 

SWEATERS 

JERSEYS 

RUNNING PANTS 

ATHLETIC HOSE 




CARRYALL BAGS 

DUFFEL BAGS 

CANOE CUSHIONS 

BOXING GLOVES 

STRIKING BAGS 



NA/rite for Illustrated Catalog and 
Official Rule Books on All Major Sports, FREE 



THE DRAPER-MAYNARD CO. 

PLYMOUTH, IN. H., U. S. A. 

MANUFACTURERS 



i2o THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



WITH KINDEST REGARDS 

AND 

SINCERE GOOD WISHES 

BARRY B. CANN 

Waterbury Conn. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 121 

WHEN YOU ARE COMING TO THE 
WATER SPORTS 

Call and see my ANTIQUES 



Granville F. \A/heeler 

BRISTOL, N. H. 

SMITH'S BLUE SIGN GARAGE 

C. A. SMITH, Proprietor 
Lake Street BRISTOL, N. H. 

Prompt Service to Patrons of Camp Pasquaney 
and the Traveling Public 

GASOLINE AND SUPPLIES VULCANIZING 



i22 THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



*#* GREETINGS FROM 4* 

} LANSDOWNE POULTRY FARM | 

X ROUTE 1, BOX 1-as X 

J LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY || 



♦$* S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS * 

^ — - and — $> 

* WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS % 



♦&. HENRY LITTLE, Pres. MIXED CARS ♦$♦ 

^ E. A. CHASE, Treas. A SPECIALTY ^ 

X R- M. CHASE, Secy T 

$ CHASE GRAIN COMPANY I 

^ Incorporated •$• 



Dealer in *£ 

FLOUR, GRAIN, REED i- 



AIND ROULTRV SUPPLL 



^ PLYMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE ^ 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 123 

C. W. COOL1DGE, Jr. 

(general ilerrljatt&tHe 

Souvenirs, Post Cards, Sporting 

Goods 

5-10-25r Separtmenta 
BRISTOL, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Smith Shook and Lumber Co. 

Bristol, New Hampshire 



i24 TH E PASOUANEY ANNUAL 

CORNING GLASS WORKS 

CORNING, N. Y. 



MAKERS OF TECHNICAL GLASSWARE 



BULBS and TUBING for Incandescent Larnps 

"PYREX" Transparent Oven Ware 

"PYREX" Chernical and Apparatus Glassware 

RAILROAD ILLUMINATING GLASSWARE 

THERMOMETER TUBING 

'CONZAS" (condenser lenses for moving picture service) 

OPTICAL GLASS 
and Light Filters of special absorption or transmission 

"CONAPHORES" (automobile headlight glasses) 

ARTISTIC COLORED "STEUBEN" WARE 



Maintains the Country's Most Important 
Research Laboratory in the Glass Industry 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



125 



£1 g£ 



>^ LDslbxLbstDSLOSlbsE^lo'S I 



^E3^lbslZ3^losE>Si2>Slo^i2>sl2>s[bS^: 



>^[6s[5s[6s[6alo^E>^l^^l^^lo^[okE3^[o^E>^: 



SPRINGFIELD 
MASS. 



THE 
CITY OF HOMES 

T. L. J. 

W& ¥% &21 S<3 §03 ^<3 &Q3 $££ S<ZJ SQ3 SQ3 S^3 &Q1 ^ 



§5 W^B ^3^3 ^3^3 ^O^O^^S^S^S -^^O^D §^3^3 W ^23J05§S3 j^^O^SJS&jD 5SQ3 -^^^ 



SHSHB 



i 

^§<3SQ]^S<3S<3^&^S<3^^;§<3;§<3^^ 



126 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 




THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 127 

iRml Estate an& Insurant 

Steal lEfitalf 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Cared for on Reasonable Terms 

JttBurattr? 

Fire, Accident, Steam Boiler, Employers' Liability and 
Indemnity Insurance 

Agent for American Surety Company, Issuing Surety 
Bonds of All Kinds 

J. R. HUCKINS 

TELEPHONE 120 PLYMOUTH, IN. H. 

"ASK THE ATHLETE" 

rpHE hundreds of athletes who use James W. Brine 
-*• Co. supplies are the most impartial judges of Brine 
quality. Their opinions constitute a dependable guide for 
all buyers of athletic and sporting equipment. No better 
evidences of true merit could be presented. 

James W. Brine Co. 

286 DEVONSHIRE ST. 
BOSTON MASS. 



128 THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



BERMUDA- S DAV 
Vacation Tours $83 

And Up— Including All Expenses 

Longer Tours in Proportion 

All the Attraction of a Delightful Yachting Cruise to a Quaint 
Foreign Land. Bermuda is Cool in Summer, Average Summer 
Temperature 77 deg. 

All Sports — Modern Hotels — No Passports 

S. S. "FORT VICTORIA" S. S. "FORT ST. GEORGE" 

Sailings Wednesdays and Saturdays 

Send for Special Tours Booklet 

FURNESS BERMUDA LINE 

34 Whitehall Street, N. Y. or any Tourist Agent 



TEL. RICHMOND 1463 OSMON C. BAILEY, Pres. 

Lowell Bros. & Bailey Co. 

FRUIT AND PRODUCE 



<Ui(^>s^0L$ 



69, 71, 73 Clinton St. BOSTON, MASS. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



129 



u Good Instruction is better than Riches " 
COMPLIMENTS OF THE 

WILLIAM PENN CHARTER SCHOOL 
BOYS AND COUNSELLORS 

E. M. C. JR. 
J. N. C. 
W. S. D. 
J. W. S. JR. 
J. C. T. 




The modern floor for every 
room upstairs and down 

akt Linoleums 

The George W. Blabon Company 

PHILADELPHIA 



Look for this label 
on the face of all 
Blabon Art Lino- 



Trade Promotion and 

Demonstration Department 
Philadelphia 



ESTABLISHED 
72 YEABS 



Head Office of the 

Sales Department 

212 Fifth Ave., New York 



i.30 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



BONDS 

OF 

STATES 

COUNTIES 

CITIES 

AND 

TOWNS 
of 



The United States of America 



Edmunds Brothers 

24 Federal St. 
BOSTON MASS. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 131 




The Strongest 

Multiple-Line 

Insurance Organization 

In The World 

JETNA LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

^TNA CASUALTY AND SURETY 

COMPANY 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE CO. 

OF HARTFORD, CONN. 

MORGAN B. BRAINARD, President 



J 32 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



INSURE YOURSELF AGAINST 
MOTOR TROUBLES 

The most delicate and expensive part of 
the car— the engine— is hidden from the driver. 
Yet, countless things happen under the hood 
to cause damage. 

No one, who has operated a gasoline 
motor, and has experienced the many irregu- 
larities that constantly occur can question 
the need and utility of the 




KJ&> 



BOYCE MOTO-METER 

To the expert and the novice alike, accurate knowledge of 
conditions under the hood is most necessary. 

The BOYCE MOTO-METER will signal when more 
water is needed in the radiator ten to fifteen minutes before it starts 
steaming. It will indicate a lack of oil long before the motor is 
actually in danger. A broken fan belt is instantly detected. 

In fact, by indicating any of the thirty causes of overheating, 
the BOYCE MOTO-METER saves the car owner many expense 
bills and prevents lost compression, warped valves, leaky piston 
rings, scored cylinders, burned bearings, or a ruined motor. 

The garage or dealer you trade with carries the 
BOYCE MOTO-METER in stock, or can quick- 
ly obtain one for you. 

THE MOTO-METER CO., INC. 

LONG ISLAND CITV, JJ, V. 

BOYC E 



YOUR CAR DESERVES OI*E 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 133 

the: hillside: inn 

GEORGE! S. SIS/NTH, Proprietor 

PASQUANEY LAKE! 

EAST HEBRON NEVA/ HAMPSHIRE 

IV. G. WOOD & SOIVS 

NO, 1 PARK STREET, BOSTON 



SILVERSMITHS 

AND PRIZE MAKERS 



Hakrra nf ffiupa ano ifflpoala for (Eamp Paanuanrg 



U4 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



MANLIUS -— ar-a. 





ST. JOHN'S SCHOOL 



To do his best work in his studies, it is vital that a boy should be happy 
and contented in his school life. His recreations should be so well ordered 
and supervised that he turns to his tasks with renewed resolution and energy. 
His surroundings should be (beautiful and cheerful and his relations with his 
masters and comrades should be happy. The true military discipline, as 
evolved at Manlius, depends upon honor systems, manners and military cour- 
tesy to do away with hazing and rough school life, and this certainly makes 
for happiness here. A iboy's character is bu : lt as much out of the school room 
as in it. as much through the close touch of our boys with our teachers in their 
daily experience and in their entertainments as in the study hall or lecture 
room. In the multitude of activities at Manlius we have something to interest 
every boy and the more he can be encouraged to get into this life, the better 
is his rounding out. 

A boy at Manlius takes his recreation and military exercises in a system- 
atic and progressive way so that his play hours may not be wasted and that 
he may the while learn better manners, build up a stronger body, become a 
better mixer and 'be ready to study harder when play hour is over. 

It is the purpose of the illustrated catalog to show how this is accom- 
plished and to present the story of the environments and associations with 
which we surround our iboys. From its pages you will learn that ours is an 
earnest, businesslike and cheerful life and withal a wholesome and manly one. 

College Preparatory. Business Course. Junior School. 

Send for catalog to General William Verbeck. Box P, Manlius, N. Y. 



mem 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



*35 





THIS SPACE REPRESENTS 

NINE FULL PAGES 

CONTRIBUTED BY 

NTERESTED PATRONS AND FRIENDS 
OF CAMP PASQUANEY 











136 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



ARCHIE" 



J